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Plants Matching annual

Returned 870 results. Page 15 of 87.

Image of Capsicum annuum

James H. Schutte

(Garda Tricolor Ornamental Pepper, Ornamental Pepper)

The ornamental pepper 'Garda Tricolor' produces quantities of pudgy, upright, colorful chili peppers that resemble Christmas lights. Although its fiery-hot fruits are edible, this cultivar was developed for ornamental use.

First cultivated and selected by Native Americans thousands of years ago, peppers are bushy, brittle-stemmed annual vegetables with thin oval leaves and small five-petaled flowers. The dull-white blooms of 'Garda Tricolor' are followed by erect, conical, 1.5-inch (3.5-cm) fruits...

Image of Capsicum annuum

Jesse Saylor

(Holiday Time Ornamental Pepper, Ornamental Pepper)

Developed for use as a holiday container plant, this 1980 All-America Selections Winner produces quantities of small round showy peppers that change color as they mature. Although its fiery-hot fruits are edible, 'Holiday Time' is used exclusively as an ornamental. It was introduced by the University of Connecticut in 1980.

First cultivated and selected by Native Americans thousands of years ago, peppers are bushy, brittle-stemmed annual vegetables with thin oval leaves and small five-petaled...

Image of Capsicum annuum

James H. Schutte

(Masquerade Ornamental Pepper, Ornamental Pepper)

The ornamental pepper 'Masquerade' produces upright clusters of showy flame-shaped chilis that change color as they mature. Although its fiery-hot fruits are edible, this cultivar was developed for ornamental use.

First cultivated and selected by Native Americans thousands of years ago, peppers are bushy, brittle-stemmed annual vegetables with thin oval leaves and small five-petaled flowers. The dull-white blooms of 'Masquerade' are followed by erect, conical, 2.5-inch (6-cm) fruits that ripen...

(Ornamental Pepper, Red Missile Pepper)

The ornamental pepper 'Red Missile' produces upright clusters of showy flame-shaped fruits that change color as they mature. Although its fiery-hot fruits are edible, this cultivar was developed for ornamental use.

First cultivated and selected by Native Americans thousands of years ago, peppers are bushy, brittle-stemmed annual vegetables with thin oval leaves and small five-petaled flowers. The dull-white blooms of 'Red Missile' are followed by erect, conical, 2-inch (5-cm) fruits that ripen...

Image of Capsicum annuum

James Burghardt

(Ornamental Pepper, Sangria Ornamental Pepper)

The ornamental pepper 'Sangria' produces upright clusters of fiery-hued but mildly flavored fruit. Although its fruits are edible, this cultivar was developed for ornamental use.

First cultivated and selected by Native Americans thousands of years ago, peppers are bushy, brittle-stemmed annual vegetables with thin oval leaves and small five-petaled flowers. The dull-white blooms of 'Sangria' are followed by erect, slender, 2-inch (5-cm) fruits that ripen from green to purple to orange to red....

(Ornamental Pepper)

Bred primarily for the florist trade, these cherry pepper cultivars bear small round colorful fruit atop erect stems. Like all culinary peppers, cherry peppers (known botanically as the Cerasiforme group) trace their origin to the American tropics, where they have been cultivated since pre-Columbian times.

The bushy, knee-high plants bear thin, oval, medium- to dark-green leaves on strong upright stems. Inconspicuous white flowers appear in warm weather, followed by small, globular to ovoid,...

Image of Cardamine hirsuta photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Hairy Bittercress)

What an annoying cool season Eurasian weed! Hairy bittercress is truly a gardener's nightmare. This pesky annual is easy enough to pull and hoe, but a single plant can produce a rain of thousands of seeds in spring, making it major work to keep at bay. The word "rain" is used because the mature seedpods of hairy bittercress explode sending the many tiny seeds within up to the skies to rain down across the surrounding landscape.

Plants often sprout in fall and overwinter as small, neat rosettes...

Image of Castilleja coccinea photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Scarlet Indian Paintbrush)

Painting the eastern shortgrass prairie with orange and red plumes in summer, Indian paintbrush is an easily identifiable, hummingbird-attracting annual or biennial that’s wildly beautiful but rarely planted in the garden. That’s because it’s semi-parasitic and must live in union with specific prairie and meadow plant species to survive.

The lance-shaped leaves of this unlikely snapdragon relative are bright green and fine. Specimens may bloom in the first year or overwinter in a leafy state...

(Entireleaf Indian Paintbrush, Texas Paintbrush)

The fiery red plumes of Texas paintbrush cannot be missed when they bloom in spring. This native of the South Central United States and adjacent Mexico is an annual or biennial wildflower that favors prairies, grasslands and open woods where soils are well-drained and dry. Like other Castilleja it's a parasitic plant with roots that penetrate those of other plants to drain essential nutrients and moisture.

The leaves of this clump-forming wildflower are slender and green. As plants...

Image of Celosia argentea photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Celosia)

The colorful floral plumes, feathery spikes or dense "brainy" crests, of cockscomb and plume celosia make beautiful additions to annual borders, cutting gardens and containers.

These bushy annuals may occasionally survive for a year or more in southern regions where winters are mild. They grow quickly from seed and have foliage that can be bright green, purple-red or bronze, depending on the cultivar. Their long-lasting flowers are comprised of many small bracted flowers that can be bright yellow,...