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Plants Matching annual

Returned 870 results. Page 36 of 87.

(Busy Lizzy, Impatiens, Swirl Coral Impatiens)

In their native climate of Eastern Africa, from Tunisia to Mozambique, Impatiens are a large growing, mound-forming and eagerly self-seeding perennial. In other parts of the world, colder climates, in particular, it has become recognized as a standard bedding plant and treated as an annual. This garden favorite has an extended bloom season from late spring to mid-fall.

Swirl Series is an almost dwarf, compact variety that produces flowers that are faintly two-tone or outlined. Swirl Coral...

(Busy Lizzy, Impatiens, Swirl Monet Impatiens)

In their native climate of Eastern Africa, from Tunisia to Mozambique, Impatiens are a large growing, mound-forming and eagerly self-seeding perennial. In other parts of the world, colder climates, in particular, it has become recognized as a standard bedding plant and treated as an annual. This garden favorite has an extended bloom season from late spring to mid-fall.

Swirl Series is an almost dwarf, compact variety that produces flowers that are faintly two-tone or outlined. Flowers of...

(Busy Lizzy, Impatiens, Swirl Impatiens)

In their native climate of Eastern Africa, from Tunisia to Mozambique, Impatiens are a large growing, mound-forming and eagerly self-seeding perennial. In other parts of the world, colder climates, in particular, it has become recognized as a standard bedding plant and treated as an annual. This garden favorite has an extended bloom season from late spring to mid-fall.

Swirl Series is an almost dwarf, compact variety that produces flowers that are faintly two-tone or outlined. Flowers of...

(Hairy Indigo, Roughhairy Indigo)

Popular as a forage and green manure crop, this large bushy annual or short-lived perennial from Africa, southern Asia, and northern Australia is grown or naturalized throughout much of the tropics and subtropics.

The branching, erect or spreading stems of this vigorous plant bear pinnately compound leaves with 5 to 11 hairy, elliptical leaflets. Older stems are stout and woody. Long crowded spike-like racemes of rose-red to orange-red flowers arise from the stem tips and leaf axils from...

Image of Lactuca serriola photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Compass Plant, Horse Thistle, Prickly Lettuce)

A noxious cool season weed, prickly lettuce produces springtime rosettes of thin, waxy leaves with prickly edges and undersides. By late spring, tall, branched stems topped with small, yellow, dandelion-like flowers appear. It is a common weed throughout North America, but originates from Europe.

The thin, pale waxy green, deeply incised leaves of prickly lettuce emit white latex sap when pinched or damaged. They form rosettes that appear in spring. Small, yellow, dandelion-like flowers bloom...

Image of Lamium amplexicaule photo by: Lee Ivy

Lee Ivy

(Henbit, Henbit Deadnettle)

The small purplish tubular flowers of henbit look pretty close up but otherwise this cool-season annual or biennial weed is a garden nightmare. Eurasian in origin, it is an aggressive invasive spreader than plagues lawns, vegetable beds and roadside meadows, especially in eastern North America.

The four-sided purplish stems of henbit sprawl horizontally but turn upwards at the tips. Opposite pairs of green hairy leaves kissed with purple line the stems. The round leaf surfaces are hairy and...

Image of Lamium purpureum photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Purple Archangel, Purple Deadnettle, Red Deadnettle)

A highly weedy deadnettle, Lamium purpureum is Eurasian in origin but has spread throughout temperate regions worldwide and has become a common lawn and garden weed in North America. It is a low-growing annual spring bloomer that produces moderately attractive tiers of purplish flowers accented by purple and green leafy bracts. The foliage and flowers have a light, somewhat minty scent. Bees are drawn to the nectar-rich blooms.

This weedy member of the mint family forms mats of foliage...

Image of Lathyrus odoratus photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Sweetpea)

The sweet pea is an old favorite annual vine prized for the color and fragrance of its flowers. The blooms of this Mediterranean native have three distinctive parts: a large broad upper petal (banner), two smaller central petals (wings), and a large protruding central petal (keel). All sweet peas on the market are heavily bred and cultivated and come in all colors except true yellow. Doubles and those with ruffled petals are also available. The fruit is a flattened pea pod.

This easy to grow...

Image of Lathyrus odoratus

National Garden Bureau

(Sicilian Sweetpea, Sweetpea)

This is a very old sweet pea cultivar. In fact, its namesake is Father Francis Cupani, the seventeenth century Sicilian monk said to have selected and cultivated this fine sweet pea.

The colorful and highly fragrant 'Cupani' is a delicate but vigorous annual vine. Its blooms have a deep purple-red broad upper petal (banner), two smaller violet-purple central petals (wings), and a protruding violet-purple central petal (keel). The fruit is a flattened pea pod.

This easy to grow vine climbs...

Image of Linaria

James H. Schutte

(Hybrid Annual Linaria)

Grown for it sweet fragrance and distinctive flowers, ‘Enchantment’ offers more heat tolerance and a longer bloom season than other toadflax cultivars.

A hybrid annual, ‘Enchantment’ has erect branching stems. The leaves are thin and linear. Blooming around the tips of the stems, the small flowers resemble miniature snapdragons and bloom throughout the cool weather. Beautifully hued bi-color flowers are bright magenta with gold lips. They have insect attracting petal spurs.

Linaria...