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Plants Matching bog garden

Returned 524 results. Page 2 of 53.

Image of Acorus gramineus

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Grassleaf Sweet Flag, Variegated Sweet Flag)

Variegated sweet flag Ogon sweet flag is a semi-evergreen perennial that originates from Japan. It is grown for its neat clumping habit and grass-like foliage, which is aromatic when crushed. The cultivar ‘Variegatus’ has attractive variegated leaves of green streaked with ivory. This perennial is easy to grow if provided with rich evenly moist soil and full to partial sun. Plant in boggy gardens or in fertile beds and borders. These plants will not tolerate deep standing water.

(Colicroot)

Commonly known as colicroot, species in the genus Aletris are herbaceous flowering perennials that may be placed in Liliaceae (the lily family), Melanthiaceae or more recently Nartheciaceae, depending on which botanist you listen to. It is a small genus of 21 species of monocots native to eastern North America and Asia. Many are adapted to moist or boggy locations. Habit, appearance are similar; they produce basal rosettes of strappy foliage followed by tall, leafless racemes or spikes...

(Colicroot, Golden Colicroot)

With a tall, fleeting flower stem carrying bright golden yellow blossoms, the golden colicroot is also ornamental thanks to its foliage rosette. This herbaceous perennial is native to the American Southeast, from the District of Columbia to easternmost Texas and northern Florida. It naturally grows in pinelands, bogs, ditches and prairies.

The leaves arise from the ground to create a basal rosette of attractive light green leaves. Leaf blades are narrow, pointed lances with parallel veins, revealing...

(Bracted Colicroot, Colicroot)

Commonly known as colicroot, species in the genus Aletris are herbaceous flowering perennials that may be placed in Liliaceae (the lily family), Melanthiaceae or more recently Nartheciaceae, depending on which botanist you listen to. It is a small genus of 21 species of monocots native to eastern North America and Asia. Many are adapted to moist or boggy locations. Habit, appearance are similar; they produce basal rosettes of strappy foliage followed by tall, leafless racemes or spikes...

(Colicroot, Unicorn Root, White Colicroot)

A white flower spike that looks like a unicorn's horn jutting up from the ground is a highlight of the white colicroot. This herbaceous perennial is native to the eastern United States and Ontario, Canada. It grows in moist peaty, gravelly or sandy habitats around the southern Great Lakes or from eastern Texas up to New England on the eastern side of the Appalachians. It naturally grows in pinelands, bogs, ditches and wet grasslands. Up until the 19th century, roots of colicroot plants were dug up...

(Colicroot, Yellow Colicroot)

An ankle- to shin-high flower stem carrying bright yellow blossoms above a foliage rosette is indicating of the yellow colicroot. This herbaceous perennial is native to the American Southeast, from Savannah, Georgia to New Orleans and south to the Florida Keys. It naturally grows in pinelands, bogs, wet ditches and seasonally flooded prairies.

The leaves arise from the ground to create a basal rosette of attractive light green leaves. Leaf blades are narrow, pointed lances with parallel veins,...

(Colicroot, Southern Colicroot)

A rather diminutive rosette of bright green leaves is overlooked until the southern colicroot produces a tall flower stem by late spring. This herbaceous perennial is native to the American Southeast, from southernmost Mississippi to northern Florida's and southern Georgia's Atlantic coast. It naturally grows in moist pinelands, damp grasslands and roadside ditches. Up until the 19th century, roots of these plants were dug up and used as medicine to treat colic.

The leaves arise from the ground...

(Colicroot)

A weed-like rosette of bright green leaves is overlooked until the colicroot produces a wiry flower stem in spring. This herbaceous perennial is native to the American Southeast's coastal plain, a naturally occurring hybrid between the southern colicroot (Aletris obovata) and yellow colicroot (Aletris lutea) where their natural ranges overlap. It naturally grows in moist pinelands, damp grasslands and roadside ditches. Up until the 19th century, roots of these plants were dug up...

Image of Allium ursinum photo by: International Flower Bulb Centre

International Flower Bulb Centre

(Bear Garlic)

Chinese chives, a bulbous perennial, are grown both for their umbels of star-shaped white flowers and their edible foliage. The flowers have a fragrance like violets and bloom from late summer to autumn. The flower stalks emerge from a basal clump of upright, grayish green, grassy leaves. Alliums belong to the onion family and thus all have the familiar pungent fragrance when their leaves or stems are crushed. This ornamental onion is native to Southeast Asia, where it grows in full sun and well-draining,...

Image of Alnus glutinosa photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(European Alder)

Black alder is a medium-sized, fast-growing, deciduous tree native to Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa, but has naturalized in other regions including the northeastern and central United States. It bears handsome, glossy, dark-green leaves from spring to fall, and its catkins provide mild interest in winter and early spring.

Requiring sun but thriving in most soils, it excels as a shade or screening tree in sites that are too damp or barren for other trees. It may be invasive in some...