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Plants Matching bog garden

Returned 524 results. Page 29 of 53.

(European Meadow Rush, Straight Rush)

Across the moist fields and waterside habitats of northern Europe, grow broom-like clumps of the European meadow rush. This semi-evergreen perennial looks like a grass and slowly spreads via underground roots. It often visually dominates moist meadows, as the stiff foliage is poisonous to livestock.

The leaves are light sea green to barely blue-green. The upright to arching blades are long and tubular, looking like a grass. The tiny yellow-green to tan flowers are overlooked, appearing at leaf...

(Afro Meadow Rush, European Meadow Rush)

This is a curly version of the straight hard rush thrives both in a wild wetland and a constrained modern container garden. Its parent species dwells in moist habitats across northern Europe, but 'Afro' exhibits a greater ability to survive dry spells than its parent. In habitat these plants live in the margins of waterways that rise and fall with the seasons. This makes them tolerant of growing in both dry ground as well as when fully inundated. This dark forest green, grass-like perennial has wiry,...

Image of Juncus inflexus

James Burghardt

(Blue Arrows Rush, European Meadow Rush)

An upright European meadow rush selection, 'Blue Arrows' is loved for its greenish gray-blue foliage. Native to the moist habitats across northern Europe, it is a perennial that looks very much like a grass.

The Blue Arrows rush slowly spreads via underground roots to form a tall, graceful clump. The leaf color ranges from light green to rich gray-blue. The upright blades are long and tubular, looking like a grass. The tiny yellow-green to tan flowers are overlooked, appearing at leaf tips...

(Blue Mohawk European Meadow Rush, European Meadow Rush)

An award-winning cultivar of European meadow rush, 'Blue Meadow' is loved for its more intense blue-green foliage. Native to the moist habitats across northern Europe, it is a perennial that looks very much like a grass.

The Blue Mohawk rush slowly spreads via underground roots to form a tall, graceful clump. The leaves are sea green to rich blue-green. The upright to arching blades are long and tubular, looking like a grass. The tiny yellow-green to tan flowers are overlooked, appearing at...

(Graceful Grasses® Collection)

Proven Winners® created a collection of grassy plants with fine-textured, ornate foliage with graceful forms in the Graceful Grasses® Series. Not all members of the collection are true grasses (members of Poaceae). Instead, some of the best modern cultivars of papyrus, rush and sedge are included, offering gardeners a wide selection of grass-like plants suitable for various soil conditions.

Cultivation needs varies among the series members. Water-loving plants include the King Tut® and Baby Tut®...

(Looseflower Water-willow)

The lanky wildflower, looseflower water-willow displays small, delicate blossoms on its stem tips in late spring and summer. This upright herbaceous perennial is native to the southeastern United States, from the Ohio River Valley southward, and grows in wetlands.

Its sparse, opposite leaves are long, lance-shaped and taper at the ends. In mid-spring to midsummer, the stem tips hold solitary or paired dainty flowers of white, pink or lavender-blue flowers with lighter, spotted throats. Each flower...

Image of Kalmia angustifolia photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Narrow-leaved Laurel, Sheep Laurel)

In early summer, sheep laurel bears clusters of small, dainty, chalice-shaped flowers among its linear evergreen leaves. This species originates from eastern North America where it naturally inhabits prairies, meadows and forest margins where soils are moist, organic-rich and moderately acid.

The elongated foliage of this compact, somewhat spreading shrub is fully evergreen and often blue-green. In early to midsummer it produces clusters of flowers that are chalice-shaped with crimped edges....

Image of Larix laricina photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Eastern Larch, Tamarack)

Illuminating the fall landscape with golden yellow needles, tamarack reaches skyward with its tall, open-branched, pyramid-like form. A tree native to much of Canada and the far northern United States, it is a relatively slow-growing deciduous conifer that thrives where soils are moist and summers cool. It is often found growing in bogs alongside wild blueberries and cranberries.

The needles are green to blue-green, short, three-sided and arranged in spiraled clusters atop short stubby spurs....

(Blue Sparkler Eastern Larch, Eastern Larch)

Brightening the landscape with a dense foliar display of light blue-green needles, Blue Sparkler dwarf tamarack also heralds fall with golden yellow needles. Native to much of Canada and the extreme northern United States, this variety was selected by Sid Waxman of the University of Connecticut. It is a vigorous, dwarfed, deciduous shrub that will become broader than tall.

The needles are bright blue-green, short, three-sided and arranged densely in spiral clusters atop short stubby spurs. The...

Image of Larix laricina

Mark A. Miller

(Deborah Waxman Eastern Larch, Eastern Larch)

A compact, conical dwarf shrub, the blue-green needles of Deborah Waxman dwarf tamarack turn coppery gold in autumn. Native to much of Canada and the extreme northern United States, this variety was selected by Sid Waxman of the University of Connecticut. It is a very slow growing, dwarf, deciduous cone-bearing shrub with dense branches and needled foliage.

The needles are bright blue-green, short, three-sided and arranged densely in spiral clusters atop short stubby spurs. The branchlets are...