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Plants Matching bog garden

Returned 524 results. Page 37 of 53.

Image of Osmunda regalis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Regal Fern)

Regal, that is of outstanding merits, is but one way to describe the tremendously elegant fronds of the regal fern. A deciduous large fern that grows from an upright, massive rhizome that can become trunk-like, it is native to eastern North America, much of Europe and extreme northern Africa in moist swamps and bogs. The upright rhizome can branch with age and is covered in hairs and scars wrapped in black fibrous roots, called osmunda fiber.

Ranging from modestly sized to massive, the fronds...

Image of Petasites japonicus photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Giant Butterbur, Japanese Butterbur)

Producing alien-like, short flower stems in spring before the attractive, large green leaves appear, giant butterbur is an exquisite oddity for use in water gardens and very moist woodland glens. An herbaceous perennial that aggressively spreads into large clumps via underground stems (rhizomes), this native to streamsides in China, Korea and Japan is in the daisy family.

In very late winter and early spring, short stems emerge from the soil and reveal a rounded cluster of creamy ivory flowers...

Image of Petasites japonicus

Jessie Keith

(Giant Butterbur, Japanese Butterbur, Variegated Butterbur)

Producing alien-like, short flower stems in spring before the attractive, large green leaves appear, giant butterbur is an exquisite oddity for use in water gardens and very moist woodland glens. An herbaceous perennial that aggressively spreads into large clumps via underground stems (rhizomes), this native to streamsides in China, Korea and Japan is in the daisy family.

In very late winter and early spring, short stems emerge from the soil and reveal a rounded cluster of creamy ivory flowers...

Image of Petasites japonicus

Jessie Keith

(Giant Butterbur, Japanese Butterbur, Purple Butterbur)

Producing alien-like, short flower stems in spring before the attractive, large purplish green leaves appear, purple butterbur is an exquisite oddity for use in water gardens and very moist woodland glens. An herbaceous perennial that aggressively spreads into large clumps via underground stems (rhizomes), this native to streamsides in China, Korea and Japan is in the daisy family.

In very late winter and early spring, short stems emerge from the soil and reveal a rounded cluster of creamy ivory...

(Giant Butterbur, Japanese Butterbur, Variegated Butterbur)

Producing alien-like, short flower stems in spring before the magnificent, large white, light yellow and green leaves appear, variegated butterbur is an exquisite oddity for use in water gardens and very moist woodland glens. An herbaceous perennial that aggressively spreads into large clumps via underground stems (rhizomes), this native to streamsides in China, Korea and Japan is in the daisy family.

In very late winter and early spring, short stems emerge from the soil and reveal a rounded...

(Thickleaf Phlox)

Thick, leathery leaves upon a tall stem gives the thickleaf phlox its name, but its glory is the white, violet or deep pink flowers that appear in the heat of summer. This typically evergreen, upright perennial is native to the moist, acidic soils of woodland edges across the American Southeast.

Leaves are usually dark green and glossed, narrowly lance-like and leathery. They are held opposite each other on tall stems. During the heat of summer, stem tips bear a tight cluster of white, pink or...

(Thickleaf Phlox)

Thick, leathery leaves upon shorter than usual stems gives the Bill Baker thickleaf phlox its fame, but its glory is the rosy pink flowers that appear in the heat of early summer. This typically evergreen, upright perennial is native to the moist, acidic soils of woodland edges across the American Southeast.

Leaves are bright green and glossed, narrowly lance-like and leathery. They are held opposite each other on upright stems. In early summer, stem tips bear a tight cluster of pink blossoms...

(Lanceleaf Fogfruit, Lanceleaf Lippia, Northern Fogfruit)

Carpeting the ground, the lush light green foliage of northern fogfruit is accented in summer's warmth with tiny clusters of pale lavender-pink flowers that attract bees and butterflies. A semi-evergreen to deciduous, mat-forming perennial it can tolerate heat and humidity as well as chilly winters, it is native to southeastern Canada, most of the United States southward into Mexico.

The sprawling to upright, purplish stems have pairs of lance-shaped leaves that have tiny teeth on their edges....

Image of Picea mariana photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Black Spruce, Maryland Spruce)

The black spruce is an elegant evergreen tree that is spire-like with drooping branches that upcurve like eyelashes at their tips. It is a native of northern North America, from Alaska to the northernmost tier of the eastern United States. Often found growing in cool, moist soils, it has a shallow root system and is easily toppled by winds. This is a boreal species.

The needles of black spruce are four-sided, shiny and dark blue-green. The spry branches are relatively short, angle downward and...

Image of Picea mariana

Mark A. Miller

(Black Spruce, Blue Nest Spruce)

This dwarf evergreen shrub is an exceptional plant for rock gardens and mountain communities. Its parent species is the black spruce tree of North American forests that can be found from Newfoundland to Alaska in peat bogs and moist upland sites. This indicates a tolerance for wet ground, which is a valuable problem solver where soils are too dense or poorly drained for other conifers. This squat ground hugging shrub produces fine branching covered with a soft gray bark. Short, four sided dark blue-green...