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Plants Matching bog garden

Returned 524 results. Page 41 of 53.

Image of Sarracenia

James Burghardt

(Case's Resolve Pitcher Plant, Pitcher Plant)

A tidy, clump-forming plant with upright pitchers with hoods that resemble flat-topped cobra heads, 'Case's Resolve' is the result from years of various hybridizing experiments by Larry Mellichamp and Rob Gardner from botanical gardens in North Carolina. This semi-evergreen perennial resulted from a cross between the hooded pitcher plant (Sarracenia minor and an ambiguous hybrid cultivar named 'Bog Witch'.

Growing from short, thick rhizomes (underground stems), the Case's Resolve pitcher...

Image of Sarracenia

James H. Schutte

(Dixie Lace Pitcher Plant, Pitcher Plant)

Dark red pitchers with lace-like vein patterns on the fuzzy dark red pitchers makes the Dixie Lace pitcher plant one of the first of many hybrid carnivorous plants created for ornamental garden display and enjoyment. The result of hybridizing various native pitcher plants over the 1980s and early 1990s, 'Dixie Lace' was selected by breeders Larry Mellichamp and Rob Gardner from botanical gardens in North Carolina. This semi-evergreen perennial becomes dormant only when drought, extreme cold or fire...

Image of Sarracenia

PlantHaven

(Doodlebug Pitcher Plant, Pitcher Plant)

Collectively called "pitcher plants", these terrestrial North American natives can be found in bogs and other wetlands from the Northwest Territories of Canada down to Florida. There are approximately nine non-hybrid species of Sarracenia and around 15 hybrid species. In recent years, many new and exciting cultivars have been developed. All species are insectivorous, meaning they kill and digest insects, and have wonderfully interesting pitchers and umbrella-like flowers.

The pitchers...

Image of Sarracenia

PlantHaven

(Ladybug Pitcher Plant, Pitcher Plant)

Collectively called "pitcher plants", these terrestrial North American natives can be found in bogs and other wetlands from the Northwest Territories of Canada down to Florida. There are approximately nine non-hybrid species of Sarracenia and around 15 hybrid species. In recent years, many new and exciting cultivars have been developed. All species are insectivorous, meaning they kill and digest insects, and have wonderfully interesting pitchers and umbrella-like flowers.

The pitchers...

Image of Sarracenia

James H. Schutte

(Mardi Gras Pitcher Plant, Pitcher Plant)

A tidy, clump-forming plant with upright pitchers with hoods that resemble spotted cobra heads, 'Mardi Gras' is the result of joint hybridizing efforts by Larry Mellichamp and Rob Gardner from botanical gardens in North Carolina. This semi-evergreen perennial has genes from three species: Sarracenia purpurea, S. leucophylla and S. psittacina.

Growing from short, thick rhizomes (underground stems), the Mardi Gras pitcher plant has a whorl of pitcher-like leaf bodies...

Image of Sarracenia

PlantHaven

(Pitcher Plant, Redbug Pitcher Plant)

Collectively called "pitcher plants", these terrestrial North American natives can be found in bogs and other wetlands from the Northwest Territories of Canada down to Florida. There are approximately nine non-hybrid species of Sarracenia and around 15 hybrid species. In recent years, many new and exciting cultivars have been developed. All species are insectivorous, meaning they kill and digest insects, and have wonderfully interesting pitchers and umbrella-like flowers.

The pitchers...

(Pitcher Plant)

Collectively called "pitcher plants", these terrestrial North American natives can be found in bogs and other wetlands from the Northwest Territories of Canada down to Florida. There are approximately nine non-hybrid species of Sarracenia and around 15 hybrid species. In recent years, many new and exciting cultivars have been developed. All species are insectivorous, meaning they kill and digest insects, and have wonderfully interesting pitchers and umbrella-like flowers.

The pitchers...

Image of Sarracenia

James Burghardt

(Pitcher Plant, Tattletale Delegation Pitcher Plant)

Collectively called "pitcher plants", these terrestrial North American natives can be found in bogs and other wetlands from the Northwest Territories of Canada down to Florida. There are approximately nine non-hybrid species of Sarracenia and around 15 hybrid species. In recent years, many new and exciting cultivars have been developed. All species are insectivorous, meaning they kill and digest insects, and have wonderfully interesting pitchers and umbrella-like flowers.

The pitchers...

(Little Bugs™ Pitcher Plant)

Collectively called "pitcher plants", these terrestrial North American natives can be found in bogs and other wetlands from the Northwest Territories of Canada down to Florida. There are approximately nine non-hybrid species of Sarracenia and around 15 hybrid species. In recent years, many new and exciting cultivars have been developed. All species are insectivorous, meaning they kill and digest insects, and have wonderfully interesting pitchers and umbrella-like flowers.

The pitchers...

(Pale Pitcher Plant)

The elegant pale pitcher plant produces long, tall, insect-catching pitchers of pale yellow-green with purplish highlights and venation. Pale cream and yellowish green flowers are produced in spring. Naturally distributed in the American South, from Alabama across to Texas, it exists in peaty seepage bogs and pine savannah wetlands where soils are nutrient-poor and surprisingly rich in clay. Typically grown as a specialty bog garden plant, this attractive pitcher plant is parent to several hybrids...