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Plants Matching bog garden

Returned 524 results. Page 42 of 53.

Image of Sarracenia flava photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Trumpets, Yellow Pitcher Plant, Yellow Trumpet)

Collectively called "pitcher plants", these terrestrial North American natives can be found in bogs and other wetlands from the Northwest Territories of Canada down to Florida. There are approximately nine non-hybrid species of Sarracenia and around 15 hybrid species. In recent years, many new and exciting cultivars have been developed. All species are insectivorous, meaning they kill and digest insects, and have wonderfully interesting pitchers and umbrella-like flowers.

The pitchers...

Image of Sarracenia leucophylla photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(White Pitcher Plant, White Trumpet, White-Topped Pitcher Plant)

Perhaps the showiest carnivorous plant species native to the United States, the white-topped pitcher plant's tube-like leaves themselves look like flowers. They're so attractive -- with white hoods with red-pink veins -- that the American floral industry intensely and often illegally harvests them from the wild for sale as dried cut flowers. White-topped pitcher plant naturally grows from Mississippi to the Florida Panhandle in sandy bogs alongside other species of pitcher plants. Its habitat is...

Image of Sarracenia leucophylla

James H. Schutte

(Tarnok White Pitcher Plant, White Pitcher Plant)

A sterile ornamental carnivorous plant,, the Tarnok white pitcher plant's tube-like leaves themselves look like flowers. The main difference between this cultivar and wild plants is that Tarnok's flowers are mutations that lack proper female sex organ structure and extra sepals form to create a ruffled, double-form blossom.

The pitcher plant grows as a clumping rosette of small green leaves called phyllodia. In both spring and late summer, 'Tarnok' produces upright modified leaves that look like...

Image of Sarracenia minor photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Hooded Pitcher Plant)

Seeing the hooded pitcher plant, you may describe it as resembling a clump of tubes with villainesque hoods or long scowling eyebrows. Compared to other pitcher plants, this species' hoods are much more horizontally curved and protective of the pitcher top openings, and lack any frilly edges. Hooded pitcher plant is native to the sandy bogs of the coastal plain from eastern North Carolina to Florida as far south as Lake Okeechobee.

Hooded pitcher plant grows as a low rosette of small green leaves...

Image of Sarracenia minor var. minor photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Small Hooded Pitcher Plant)

Seeing the small hooded pitcher plant, you may described it as resembling as a clump of tubes with villainesque hoods or long scowling eyebrows. Compared to other pitcher plants, this species' hoods are much more horizontally curved and protective of the pitcher top openings, and lack any frilly edges. Hooded pitcher plant is native to the sandy bogs of the coastal plain from eastern North Carolina to Florida as far south as Lake Okeechobee. Natural variety minor is the most widespread form...

Image of Sarracenia oreophila photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Green Pitcher Plant)

With light green flowers and pitchers of green marked with maroon veins, the green pitcher plant is one of the native carnivorous plants of the southern Appalachian Mountains in the American Southeast. It is an endangered species and listed on the federal registry, making collection and movement of this protected species' plant or seed forms legal only with special permitting.

The pitcher plant grows as a low rosette of small green leaves called phyllodia that sprout anew in summer. In spring,...

Image of Sarracenia purpurea photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Purple Pitcher Plant)

The bizarrely beautiful purple pitcher plant creates a rosette of squat purple pitchers perfectly designed for insect capture. This semi-evergreen perennial exists in boggy pockets from the Northwest Territories of Canada down to Florida and Texas. (Adjunct populations also exist in California.) It is semi-evergreen, and only drought, extreme cold, and fire will send it into full dormancy. There are four Sarracenia purpurea subspecies which vary in color, size and hardiness. Many have been...

Image of Sarracenia purpurea var. venosa photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Purple Pitcher Plant, Southern Purple Pitcher Plant)

The southern form of the purple pitcher plant creates a rosette of short, plump, dark red pitchers designed for insect capture. The frilly hoods atop each pitcher are light green with dark red veins. This semi-evergreen perennial exists in boggy pockets of the coastal plain from eastern Virginia southward to Georgia. It is semi-evergreen, and only drought, extreme cold, and fire will send it into full dormancy.

Growing from short, thick rhizomes (underground stems), purple pitcher plant has...

Image of Sarracenia rosea photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Burk's Pitcher Plant, Rose Pitcher Plant)

Short, plump pitcher-like leaves and a pastel pink flower set the Burk's pitcher plant apart from other Sarracenia species. Native to the coastal plains of the American Southeast from southern Mississippi to Georgia and northern Florida, it grows in sun-kissed sandy bogs. It is one of the easiest pitcher plants to grow indoors as a houseplant or in a terrarium, as it does not need a markedly cold winter dormancy to live long-term.

Burk's pitcher plant grows as a low rosette of small...

Image of Sarracenia x catesbaei photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Catesbae Pitcher Plant)

Collectively called "pitcher plants", these terrestrial North American natives can be found in bogs and other wetlands from the Northwest Territories of Canada down to Florida. There are approximately nine non-hybrid species of Sarracenia and around 15 hybrid species. In recent years, many new and exciting cultivars have been developed. All species are insectivorous, meaning they kill and digest insects, and have wonderfully interesting pitchers and umbrella-like flowers.

The pitchers...