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Plants Matching bog garden

Returned 524 results. Page 44 of 53.

Image of Taxodium distichum

Mark A. Miller

(Bald Cypress, Peve Minaret Bald Cypress)

A mature bald cypress is a wonderfully regal tree. 'Peve Minaret' differs from the norm by producing a candelabra-shaped canopy and maturing much smaller. This dwarf deciduous conifer has exquisitely soft, delicate needles that look feathery along its upward-angled branches. Bald cypress is naturally distributed in low, moist locations across much of the central and eastern United States. Mature specimens develop a neat pyramidal habit.

In spring, the bare branches become covered with soft, compound...

Image of Thelypteris decursive-pinnata photo by: Bosh Bruening

Bosh Bruening

(Beech Wood Fern, Japanese Beech Fern, Winged Beech Fern)

Japanese Beech Fern, a slightly tender perenial native to eastern Asia, grows in tufts of graceful, airy, pale-green fronds. The fronds are deciduous and divided into pinnae (frondlets)that occasionally are themselves divided.

This fern grows best in consistently moist to wet conditions and part shade to full shade. Its height and color lend it distinction among other perennials that tolerate wet feet. It is perfect for a moist, shady border or rock wall.

Image of Thelypteris palustris photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Eastern Marsh Fern)

An attractive, medium-sized, deciduous fern that does well in damp soil, marsh fern occurs throughout much of the middle and upper latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Its lacy, erect, pale blue-green fronds spread rapidly via wandering underground rhizomes. Spores are borne on fertile fronds whose segments have curled margins.

This hardy, vigorously spreading, moisture-loving fern grows best in partial to full sun. It is adaptable to most soils that are not dry or submerged. It is perfect for...

Image of Tradescantia virginiana photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Virginia Spiderwort)

Tall, arching leaves of deep green are accompanied by stems holding small clusters of blue-violet flowers in the summertime on the Virginia spiderwort. A clumping herbaceous perennial that will reseed itself, it hails from the east-central United States.

The grass-like leaves are first upright and as they grow become floppy, greating a mophead clump. Repeatedly across the warmth of late spring and summer, sturdy stems rise just above the foliage to reveal a loose cluster of three-petaled flowers...

(Chinese Globeflower)

The lacy rounded leaves of this Asian native beautifully complement the rich orange-yellow summertime flowers. The latest blooming of the globeflowers, it bears its large up-facing bowl-shaped flowers on thigh-high stems from early to midsummer. Opening wide from globular buds, the mildly fragrant blooms have numerous ruffled segments and a central boss of long stamens with orange anthers. Bees and butterflies visit the flowers. The toothed, deeply five-lobed mid-green leaves form a lush clump. The...

Image of Trollius chinensis

James H. Schutte

(Chinese Globeflower)

An especially large-flowered selection of a beautiful late-blooming globeflower from eastern Asia, 'Golden Queen' bears its large upfacing orange-yellow flowers on sturdy thigh-high stems from early to midsummer. Opening wide from globular buds, the mildly fragrant, bowl-shaped blooms have numerous ruffled segments and a central boss of long stamens with orange anthers. Bees and butterflies visit the flowers. The toothed, deeply five-lobed mid-green leaves form a lush lacy clump. The ripe fruit is...

Image of Trollius europaeus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(European Globeflower)

The lacy rounded leaves of this European native beautifully complement the rich yellow spring flowers. One of the earliest blooming globeflowers, this herbaceous perennial bears its ping-pong-ball-sized, up-facing blossoms on knee-high stems from mid to late spring. The globular blooms have numerous rounded "petals" and a central boss of golden-yellow stamens. Bees and butterflies visit the flowers. The toothed, deeply five- to seven-lobed, dark green leaves form a lush clump. The ripe fruit is brown...

Image of Trollius laxus photo by: ©Pennystone Gardens

©Pennystone Gardens

(American Globeflower)

A lovely and rare wildflower from alkaline wetlands of eastern North America, this hardy herbaceous perennial is well worth growing for its sunny spring blooms and handsome foliage.

The rich green, heavily incised, five-parted leaves of American globeflower form lush textured mounds. The pale- to bright-yellow, solitary, five-lobed flowers arise on stout, upright, compact stems from early to late spring, with later rebloom sometimes occurring. The centers of the cupped flowers bristle with...

Image of Trollius x cultorum photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Cultivated Globeflower, Hybrid Globeflower)

Hybirds of the European native Trollius europaeus, these herbaceous perennials feature sunny late-spring flowers and lacy rounded leaves. The golfball-sized, peony-shaped blooms appear on knee-high to thigh-high stems in late spring, sometimes continuing into early summer. Opening from globular buds, the flowers have numerous ruffled segments and a central boss of orange-yellow stamens. Bees and butterflies visit the flowers. The toothed, deeply five-lobed, mid-green leaves form a lush clump....

(Cultivated Globeflower, Hybrid Globeflower)

The lacy rounded leaves of this herbaceous perennial beautifully complement the rich orange-yellow late spring flowers. A hybrid of the European native Trollius europaeus, it bears its golfball-sized, bowl-shaped blooms on thigh-high stems from late spring to early summer. Opening from globular buds, the peony-shaped flowers have numerous ruffled segments and a central boss of orange-yellow stamens. Bees and butterflies visit the flowers. The toothed, deeply five-lobed, mid-green leaves...