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Plants Matching bog garden

Returned 524 results. Page 6 of 53.

Image of Astilbe

James H. Schutte

(Astilbe, False Spirea, Sprite False Spirea)

'Sprite' is a clump-forming, herbaceous perennial with summertime plume flowers. It is a tall hybrid cultivar with deeply-jagged green leaves and a drooping inflorescence of pale pink flowers which bloom in midsummer.

Sprite astilbe requires full sun to partial shade and must be grown in moist, well-drained soils and perform best in shady locations. The flowerheads fade to attractive shades of brown in the fall, providing landscape interest through winter. This cultivar is especially good as...

(Astilbe, False Spirea, William Buchanan False Spirea)

William Buchanan astilbe is a dwarf, clump-forming, herbaceous perennial that produces 2-ternate, red-tinted leaves and a striking plume-like inflorescence of white flowers with red stamens in mid and late summer. Thus, the inflorescence looks pink. The flowerheads fade to attractive shades of brown in the fall, providing landscape interest through winter.

'William Buchanan' requires well-drained, moist soils in full sun to partial shade. The function best in shade borders, rock gardens, or...

Image of Astilbe (Simplicifolia Group) photo by: Blooms of Bressingham

Blooms of Bressingham

(Astilbe, False Spirea)

Star astilbe (Simplicifolia Group hybrids) are clump-forming, herbaceous perennials that were first native to wooded areas of eastern Asia, primarily Japan before being crossed with other species. They are usually compact and low-growing with compound leaves (although the species has simple oval leaves) and plume-like floral inflorescences of pink, rose, and white borne in the summer. The flowerheads fade to attractive shades of brown in the fall, providing landscape interest through early winter....

(Astilbe, False Spirea, Key False Spirea)

Star astilbe (Simplicifolia Group hybrids) are clump-forming, herbaceous perennials that were first native to wooded areas of eastern Asia, primarily Japan before being crossed with other species. They are usually compact and low-growing with compound leaves (although the species has simple oval leaves) and plume-like floral inflorescences of pink, rose, and white borne in the summer. The flowerheads fade to attractive shades of brown in the fall, providing landscape interest through early winter....

(Astilbe)

Pale lilac blue flowerheads and low-growing, crinkled green foliage make the dwarf astilbe among the most cherished plants for woodland and shade gardens in temperate regions. This hybrid resulted in the early 20th century from efforts by Georg Arends of Ronsdorf, Germany.

Short mounds of dark green, twice divided, fern-like leaves grow from thick, brown rhizomes (lateral underground stems). The showy, pyramidal flowerheads appear in summer above the leaves. Blooms are lilac to lavender-blue,...

Image of Astilboides tabularis photo by: Russell Stafford

Russell Stafford

(Astilboides, Shieldleaf Rodgersia)

Bring drama to a cool, shady woodland garden by planting the shieldleaf rodgersia, which captures attention with its large, jagged leaves and upright flower stems. A clump-forming herbaceous perennial, its native range is northeastern China and North Korea. Slow-growing, creeping rhizome roots eventually create a broad plant in the landscape.

Light green leaves emerge in spring, with softly hairy surfaces. Each blade rises on a long petiole stem that attaches in the blade center. The leaf is...

Image of Azolla photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Mosquito Fern)

It's hard to believe the species in family of aquatic, floating plants are in fact miniscule ferns. There are approximately 13 species of Azolla, which can be found across the Northern Hemisphere. They are free-floating plants that exist atop the water's surface and all are very tiny. If fact, they are the smallest of the ferns. They tend to be feather-like and may be adapted to fresh or brackish water.

These little ferns thrive in pools with full or partial sun. If you wish to add Azolla...

(Carolina Mosquito Fern)

Native to much of the eastern half of North America, Carolina mosquito fern is a tiny, feather aquatic fern that floats on the surface of still ponds and lake edges. Populations also extend down into Mexico and Central America. Its tiny fronds are bright green, often with a reddish or purplish-red hue. It's hard to believe this aquatic, floating plant is in fact a miniscule fern. It is free-floating and may be adapted to fresh or brackish water.

Carolina mosquito fern thrives in pools with full...

Image of Azolla filiculoides photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Pacific Mosquito Fern)

It's hard to believe the species in family of aquatic, floating plants are in fact miniscule ferns. There are approximately 13 species of Azolla, which can be found across the Northern Hemisphere. They are free-floating plants that exist atop the water's surface and all are very tiny. If fact, they are the smallest of the ferns. They tend to be feather-like and may be adapted to fresh or brackish water.

These little ferns thrive in pools with full or partial sun. If you wish to add Azolla...

(Feather Mosquito Fern)

This species may be considered invasive and/or a noxious weed in some locations. For more information about its invasiveness visit http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=AZPI