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Plants Matching bog garden

Returned 524 results. Page 8 of 53.

Image of Caltha palustris photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Cowslip, Golden Marsh Marigold, Kingcup)

Brightening the streambanks or bogs in midspring with showy yellow buttercup flowers, marsh marigold is a lovely woodland wildflower. A deciduous, mounding aquatic perennial, it is native to the northern half of North America from Alaska to Newfoundland south to Iowa and North Carolina.

The thick, spreading, hollow stems carry lush green heart-shaped leaves with dull jagged teeth. In mid- to late spring, the branching stems bear small loose clusters of bright yellow flowers that are waxy. Shaped...

Image of Canna

Ednie Flower Bulb, Inc.

(Aida Canna, Canna, Canna Lily)

Aida canna is an easy-to-grow, tropical to subtropical herbaceous plant that may be grown as a perennial in tropical regions or tender perennial in temperate regions. Developed in the 1920’s by Howard and Smith, ‘Aida’ is part of the premier group of cannas and has large, showy, lily-like flowers of salmon pink to peach and bold fresh green leaves.

Its thick fleshy rhizomes transplant and divide easily, and in temperate zones it may be dug and brought into a cool, dry garage or basement to...

Image of Canna glauca photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Maraca Amarilla, Water Canna)

A large, upright tender perennial, Canna glauca is native to the tropical wetlands of the U.S. It is medium-tall and grows as a clump of long, pointed, upright blue-green leaves, unfurling from a rising stem eventually topped by clusters of tapered flower buds that open from spring into autumn to spidery yellow flowers. Prune stems to the highest leaf before the spent flowers make seeds to encourage the growth of new stems and prolong flowering.

Like other cannas, this one is grown as...

Image of Carex

Kieft-Pro-Seeds

(Prairie Fire Sedge, Sedge)

This is an eye-catching, useful selection of a sedge native to New Zealand. The slender grassy leaves grow in a wide clump shaped like a fountain. They are blue-green on top, white on the underside, with tips that curl back on themselves and twist to reveal the white side, making the perimeter of the clump look misty. Though it much resembles an ornamental grass, it comes from a different family all together, and like many of its fellow sedges, is more versatile than grasses, being tolerant of both...

(Spring Sedge)

The spring sedge is mid-sized sedge grown for its evergreen tufts of shaggy, narrow leaves. In mid spring, tall stalks of tan seeds emerge; this is the earliest sedge to flower. It spreads by rhizomes and can reach several feet across. The spring sedge is native to the northeastern United States where it thrives in moist soil in partial to full shade.

Grow the spring sedge in constantly moist, alkaline soil. Do not let it dry out. Trim off any dead foliage in the early spring. With time, this...

Image of Carex caryophyllea

Mary S. Thomas

(Spring Sedge, The Beatles Spring Sedge, Vernal Sedge)

This is an eye-catching, useful selection of a sedge native to the U.S. The long, slender leaves grow in a mop-like clump, hence the cultivar name. ‘The Beatles.’ The short flower stems barely rise beyond the leaves. They appear in spring, earliest among the sedges (hence the common name of this plant, spring sedge). In bloom, the flower spikes briefly resemble fuzzy catkins and the seedpods that follow are distinctively multi-pointed. Though it much resembles an ornamental grass, it belongs to a...

Image of Carex elata

James H. Schutte

(Bowles' Golden Sedge, Golden Winged Sedge, Winged Sedge)

Golden winged sedge is an easy to grow clumping plant with chartreuse graceful, arching foliage. Its ability to grow in wet conditions makes it an excellent addition to a poorly drained site. Although it displays small blue flowers for a short period of time, it is mostly grown for its foliage as an accent to a mixed border or edging plant.

Sedge grows best in partial sun to shade with moist, acidic soil, but will adapt to normal soil conditions and even grows in shallow water as well as dry...

Image of Carex muskingumensis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Muskingum Sedge, Palm Sedge)

Named for the Muskingum River in Ohio, this Great Lakes native bears its grassy leaves in papyrus-like whorls along lax knee-high "stems" (properly known as culms). The bright green leaves become yellow-tinged in full sun. Plants spread slowly by underground rhizomes to form large clumps. Modestly attractive golden brown inflorescences appear at the culm tips in June and persist through the summer.

Muskingum sedge is very tolerant of wet soil, requiring it in full sun. It is an excellent candidate...

(Ice Fountains Palm Sedge, Muskingum Sedge, Palm Sedge)

Native to the Great Lakes region of Central North America, palm sedge bears its grassy leaves in papyrus-like whorls along lax knee-high "stems" (properly known as culms). The bright green leaves of the cultivar 'Ice Fountains' have broad white mid-stripes. The leaves become yellow-tinged in full sun. Plants spread slowly by underground rhizomes to form large clumps. Modestly attractive golden brown inflorescences appear at the culm tips in June and persist through the summer.

Muskingum sedge...

(Little Midge Palm Sedge, Muskingum Sedge, Palm Sedge)

Native to the Great Lakes region of Central North America, palm sedge bears its bright green grassy leaves in papyrus-like whorls along lax "stems" (properly known as culms). A true dwarf form, 'Little Midge' possesses leaves and culms that are less than half the size of those of most other palm sedges. The leaves become yellow-tinged in full sun. Plants spread slowly by underground rhizomes to form large clumps. Modestly attractive golden brown inflorescences appear at the culm tips in June and...