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Plants Matching bog garden

Returned 524 results. Page 9 of 53.

Image of Carex muskingumensis

James H. Schutte

(Muskingum Sedge, Oehme Palm Sedge, Palm Sedge)

Native to the Great Lakes region of Central North America, palm sedge bears its grassy leaves in papyrus-like whorls along lax knee-high "stems" (properly known as culms). The bright green leaves of the cultivar 'Oehme' develop bright yellow margins in summer. The leaf centers become yellow-tinged in full sun. Plants spread slowly by underground rhizomes to form large clumps. Modestly attractive golden brown inflorescences appear at the culm tips in June and persist through the summer.

Muskingum...

(Black Sedge)

Black Flowering Sedge Grass is a wonderful, tolerant sedge that makes an excellent edge plant to any bed or border. Dark blue green foliage grows in a twisting, clumping habit and is accented by dark brown or black flowers. As long as the soil remains wet, this sedge will grow in a variety of conditions and can be used anywhere from a pond's edge to a rock garden wall. Spreads quickly enough that it also makes a nice evergreen ground cover.

(Black Sedge, Variegated Black Sedge)

A selection of Black Flowering Sedge, ‘Variegata’ is an adaptable perennial grown for its leaves and habit. The leaves are wider than most sedges, arched and tapering, colored medium green and edged with thin margins of pale green. They grow in an upright clump. The nondescript flowers appear in clusters on long stems in. They are briefly white and give way to dark brown or black seed pods.

Grow this plant in sun to partial shade in almost any moist, well-drained soil, or even shallow water. In...

(Bob's Variegated Greater Pond Sedge, Greater Pond Sedge)

This is a strikingly variegated selection of Greater Pond Sedge, a widespread, water-loving perennial of the northern Hemisphere. Growing as a tall upright clump, ‘Bob’s Variegated’ has narrow, stiff, leaves that are upright and arching and boldly striped longwise in white and green, with the white stripes turning yellow in summer. The flowers are nondescript but appear in tall, eye-catching clusters that are briefly white and give way to brown or black seedpods.

This sedge thrives at the edge...

Image of Cephalanthus occidentalis photo by: Grandiflora

Grandiflora

(Common Buttonbush)

The American native shrub, common buttonbush, develops striking pincushion-like flower balls of ivory in summer and early fall. These are followed by attractive fruits and russet red autumn leaves. This rounded, deciduous shrub is native to much of eastern North America as well as Cuba and regions in Mexico. Wild specimens can be found growing in moist or wet soils around lakes, ponds and streams.

Buttonbush has shiny, medium green leaves that are oval to almost lance-like in shape. The leaf...

Image of Chamaedaphne calyculata photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Leatherleaf)

Leatherleaf is often the first woody shrub to colonize a bog once sphagnum peat is established. A broadleaf evergreen native to continents around the North Pole, it grows in cool wetlands, bogs and on pond edges in thickets. It spreads by underground swollen stems called rhizomes. In North America it's found across all of Canada and Alaska southward into the northern United States.

The foliage is leathery and tough and often is held upward on the many twiggy branches. The upper leaf side is...

Image of Chamerion angustifolium photo by: Rosendahl, www.public-domain-image.com

Rosendahl, www.public-domain-image.com

(Fireweed)

Commonly known as fireweed in North America, this pretty wildflower bears tall spikes of bright rose flowers in summer and fall. It is native across much of the northerly regions of the northern hemisphere where it thrives in moist ditches, old fields, open woods and along forest and stream edges. It is commonly called "fireweed" because this true pioneer species responds well to fire and is one of the first plants to seed in and thrive after a fire. It spreads by both seed and wide-spreading rhizomes...

Image of Chamerion angustifolium

Jesse Saylor

(Fireweed, White Fireweed)

White flowers don this vigorous fireweed cultivar from summer to fall. Commonly known as fireweed in North America, this pretty wildflower bears tall spikes of white flowers. Chamerion angustifolium is native across much of the northerly regions of the northern hemisphere where it thrives in moist ditches, old fields, open woods and along forest and stream edges. It is commonly called "fireweed" because this true pioneer species responds well to fire and is one of the first plants to seed...

Image of Chelone glabra photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Smooth Turtlehead)

The two-lipped, pinkish white flowers of smooth turtlehead appear in spiky terminal clusters in mid to late summer. This long-stemmed perennial wildflower can be found in marshes, moist meadows and open forests along the eastern half of North America, from Georgia up to Newfoundland. Hardiness, tolerance to moisture and wild beauty make this a good garden flower for informal or naturalistic gardens.

The tall, upright stems of smooth turtlehead are lined with lance-shaped, opposite leaves of...

Image of Colocasia

James H. Schutte

(Elephant Ear, Jet Black Wonder Taro, Taro)

Grown by gardeners solely for the exotic look and huge size of its leaves, taro is a tropical perennial. This selection, ‘Jet Black Wonder,’ has leaves that are quilted, slightly ruffled and so dark that naming their color is tricky. They are not black but a shade of deep, smoky purple. The plant grows from a large tuber-like corm (an energy-storing underground stem). The leaves rise directly from the tuber on tall, thick, arching petioles (leaf stems) that are dark purple too. The leaves pose with...