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Plants Matching broadleaf evergreen

Returned 1437 results. Page 53 of 144.

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Cape Cod American Holly)

While more spreading and dwarf compared to other American holly trees, 'Cape Cod Dwarf' doesn't remain a petite shrub after planting. It grows slowly to form a dense, mass of gray branches with satin-glossy, medium olive-green foliage. Orange-red to scarlet fruits are displayed in fall and winter. It looks low and spreading in its youth, but eventually becomes a stout, pyramid-like plant. Numerous cuttings have been taken from this cultivar with slightly varying growth habits and physical characteristics,...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Carnival American Holly)

The Carnival American holly bears bold orange-red berries in fall and winter. It grows more rapidly than other American holly selections, forming a large, dense, upright pyramid of satin-glossy, medium to deep olive-green foliage. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection, 'Carnival' produces tiny white flowers...

Image of Ilex opaca

James Burghardt

(American Holly, Carolina No. 2 American Holly)

Consistently dark green leaves provide the backdrop for the abundant crop of red berries on the Carolina No. 2 American holly. This tree becomes a dense, upright pyramid of satin-glossy, medium to dark green foliage. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection, 'Carolina No. 2' produces tiny white flowers in...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Cave Hill No. 1 American Holly)

A Theodore Klein introduction, large numbers of red berries grace the boughs of the Cave Hill No. 1 American holly in fall and winter. It develops into a dense, billowy pyramid of satin-glossy, medium olive-green foliage. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States, and Klein encountered and selected this cultivar from plants in the Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville, Kentucky. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Cheerful American Holly)

Selected and introduced into the horticultural trade by Henry Hohman of Maryland, 'Cheerful' produces a heavy crop of golden orange-red berries. It grows vigorously to form a compact, upright pyramid of satin-glossy, medium to kelly green foliage. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection, 'Cheerful' produces...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Chief Paduke American Holly)

Red to orange-red berries contrast the deep olive-green leaves on the Chief Paduke American holly in fall and winter. It develops into a dense, upright pyramid over decades of growth. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States, and Theodore Klein encountered and selected this cultivar from plants in the Paducah Cemetery in Paducah, Kentucky. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Clarendon Holly, Clarendon Spreading Holly)

While more spreading and dwarf compared to other American holly trees, ‘Clarendon' doesn't remain a petite shrub after planting. It grows very slowly to form a dense, mass of gray branches with satin-glossy, olive-green to dark green foliage. The silhouette when this plant is old is much like that of an irregularly-shaped rhododendron. Bright orange-red fruits are displayed in fall and winter. After 50 to 65 years 'Clarendon' finally matures as a broad, mounded shrub well over head-height. Sometimes...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Corpening No. 3 American Holly)

Golden-orange berry clusters contrast the dull, dark olive-green leaves on the Corpening No. 3 American holly tree in fall and winter. It eventually forms a dense, upright pyramid of foliage on gray-barked branches. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection, 'Corpening No. 3' produces tiny white flowers in...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, David Leach American Holly, Male American Holly)

David Leach American holly grows vigorously to form a dense, upright pyramid of satin-glossy, medium to dark green foliage. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A male selection, 'David Leach' does not produce fruits but bears tiny white flowers in spring that bees visit. This cultivar supplies the pollen needed for any...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Delia Bradley American Holly)

Vividly colored red berries bedeck the limbs of the Delia Bradley American holly in fall and winter. It develops into a tightly-formed, upright pyramid of satin-glossy, dark green foliage. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection, 'Delia Bradley' produces tiny white flowers in spring that bees visit. Pollen...