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Plants Matching broadleaf evergreen

Returned 1437 results. Page 55 of 144.

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Lady Alice American Holly)

Eventually ripening to red, the yellow-then-orange berries contrast the medium olive-green leaves on the King Midas American holly in fall and winter. It develops into a densely branched and leaved, upright pyramid over decades of growth. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection, 'King Midas' produces tiny...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Klein Compact American Holly)

Attaining a smaller size that is similar to a perfectly shaped Christmas tree, the Klein Compact American holly displays red berries in fall and winter. It develops into a densely branched, narrow pyramid over decades of growth. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. This cultivar was selected by Theodore Klein, the famed holly plantsman from Crestwood, Kentucky. As with most hollies, American holly is dioecious, meaning that...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Klein No. 1 American Holly)

The Klein No. 1 American holly displays reddish orange, sometimes faintly scarlet, berries in fall and winter among its medium olive-green leaves. It develops into a densely branched, upright pyramid over decades of growth. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. This cultivar was selected by Theodore Klein, the famed holly plantsman from Crestwood, Kentucky. As with most hollies, American holly is dioecious, meaning that male...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Lady Alice American Holly)

Scarlet berries line the limbs of the Lady Alice American holly in fall and winter, contrasting the deep olive-green, spiny leaves. It develops into an upright pyramid at maturity over many decades. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection, 'Lady Alice' produces tiny white flowers in spring that bees visit....

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Mamie Eisenhower American Holly)

Rich red berries decorate the boughs on Mamie Eisenhower American holly in fall and winter, contrasting the medium to dark olive-green foliage. It develops into an upright pyramid or tapering oval at maturity over many decades. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection, ‘Mamie Eisenhower’ produces tiny white...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Manig American Holly)

Distinctly orange-red berries decorate the tiered boughs on Manig American holly in fall and winter, contrasting the medium olive-green foliage. It develops into a compact, upright pyramid after many decades of slow growth. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. As with most hollies, it is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection, ‘Manig' produces tiny white flowers in...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Marsh Mutation American Holly)

A Theodore Klein introduction, red berries grace the branch tips of the Marsh Mutation American holly in fall and winter. Unlike most other American hollies, this cultivar's leaves are narrower ovals. It develops into a dense, upright pyramid of satin-glossy, medium olive-green foliage. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States, and Klein encountered and selected this cultivar from Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati, Ohio. American...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Mary Holman American Holly)

Branches of the Mary Holman American holly look evenly sprinkled with scarlet to reddish-orange berries in fall and winter. The tree develops into a dense, upright pyramid of satin-glossy, medium olive-green foliage. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States. American hollies are dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection, 'Mary Holman' produces tiny white flowers in spring that...

Image of Ilex opaca

Jesse Saylor

(American Holly, Maryland Dwarf American Holly)

Low and broad-spreading — rather than upright and pyramidal like most others of its species — 'Maryland Dwarf' is a valuable selection of American holly (Ilex opaca). The species is native to the central and eastern United States.

The attractive, spiny, evergreen leaves of 'Maryland Dwarf' are soft and bright green when new, becoming darker, duller, and more leathery in summer. Small white female flowers appear in late spring on the current year's growth. If a male American holly is...

Image of Ilex opaca

Mark A. Miller

(American Holly, Maurice River American Holly)

Branches of the large-growing Maurice River American holly fill with scarlet berries in fall and winter. The tree develops into a dense, upright pyramid of satin-glossy, richly-toned deep olive-green foliage. The species is a broadleaf evergreen tree native to the central and southeastern portions of the United States, and this cultivar was selected from trees in southern New Jersey. American hollies are dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers are borne on separate plants. A female selection,...