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Plants Matching bulb or corm or tuber

Returned 1692 results. Page 10 of 170.

Image of Anemonella thalictroides photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Rue Anemone)

Rue anemone or windflower is a woodland perennial and wildflower native to the eastern United States. This wildflower is delicate and relatively small and best seen close up to admire. From early spring until summer it bears small, white or pale pink flowers above three-lobed, dark blue-green foliage.

Rue anemone will thrive in part shade to full shade. Plant in a rock garden, on a hillside or in a woodland area next to a path or large feature such as a fallen log or rockery. It will slowly...

Rue anemone or windflower is a woodland perennial and wildflower native to the eastern United States. This wildflower is delicate and relatively small and best seen close up to admire. From early spring until summer it bears small, white or pale pink flowers above three-lobed, dark blue-green foliage.

Rue anemone will thrive in part shade to full shade. Plant in a rock garden, on a hillside or in a woodland area next to a path or large feature such as a fallen log or rockery. It will slowly...

Image of Arisaema amurense photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Amur Jack-in-the-pulpit)

Arisaema amurense is a tuberous herbaceous perennial native to Northeast Asia. In late spring, it bears a purple- and white-striped spathe with a green spadix, overtopped by one or two large, spoked, compound leaves. Bright red berries ornament the spadix in fall.

This plant prefers moist, humus-rich, well-drained soil and partial shade. It makes an excellent addition to a shade garden.

Image of Arisaema candidissimum photo by: International Flower Bulb Centre

International Flower Bulb Centre

(White-spathed Jack-in-the-pulpit)

One of the last herbaceous perennials to emerge in spring, Arisaema candidissimum is a tuberous aroid native to western China. In early summer it bears a white spathe with pink or pale green stripes, enclosing a greenish spadix. The flowers are sweetly fragrant. Large, handsome, three-lobed leaves accompany the flowers. Fruiting rarely occurs in cultivation.

Plant in full sun to partial shade in a moist, well drained soil. It is one of the most striking plants for the shade garden.

Image of Arisaema dracontium photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Green Dragon)

Arisaema dracontium is a tuberous herbaceous perennial native to eastern North America. In mid-spring it bears a narrow, cupped, green spathe, from which a long yellowish green spadix protrudes like a dragon's tongue. A large compound leaf with 7 to 19 leaflets overtops the spathe and spadix. Bright red berries ornament the spadix in late summer and fall.

This plant prefers moist, humus-rich, well-drained soil and partial shade. It makes an excellent addition to the woodland garden.

Image of Arisaema ehimense photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Japanese Jack-in-the-pulpit)

Arisaema ehimense is a tuberous herbaceous perennial native to the island of Shikoku, Japan. In late spring it bears a green- and white-striped spathe with a purple or pale green spadix, accompanied by two large compound leaves. The spathe has a long tail-like appendage at its tip. Bright orange berries ornament the spadix in late summer and fall.

This plant prefers moist, humus-rich, well-drained soil and partial shade. It makes an excellent addition to a shade garden.

Image of Arisaema ringens photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Cobra Lily)

Arisaema ringens, the Japanese cobra lily, is a tuberous herbaceous perennial native to East Asia. In early spring two large glossy trifoliate leaves emerge, overtopping a cobra-like "flower" that comprises a pale green, purple- or white-striped, hood-like spathe and a club-shaped spadix. A purple-mottled sheath surrounds each leaf stem. Bright orange berries ornament the spadix in late summer and fall.

Japanese Cobra Lily grows best in partial shade and moist, humus-rich soil. Its emerging leaves...

Image of Arisaema thunbergii photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Thunberg's Jack-in-the-pulpit, Urashima-so )

Arisaema thunbergii is a tuberous herbaceous perennial native to Korea and Japan. In spring it bears a purple, white-striped spathe, from which protrudes a long, tail-like, S-shaped spadix. A large, compound, horseshoe-shaped leaf overtops the spathe and spadix. Bright orange berries ornament the spadix in fall.

Plant in moist, well drained soil and shade. It makes an excellent addition to the shade garden.

Image of Arisaema triphyllum photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Jack-in-the-pulpit)

A familiar wildflower within its native range, Jack-in-the-pulpit is a tuberous herbaceous perennial found throughout eastern North America. In spring, it bears a pale green, white- or purple-striped spathe, over-arched by two large, glossy, three-lobed leaves. The spathe encloses a pale green or purple spadix, which in late summer produces bright orange-red berries.

This plant prefers a shady area with moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. It makes an ideal candidate for the woodland garden.

Image of Arum italicum photo by: International Flower Bulb Centre

International Flower Bulb Centre

(Italian Arum, Lords-and-Ladies)

Grown primarily for its lush, often elegantly marked leaves, this tuberous herbaceous perennial is native to southern and western Europe. The large arrowhead-shaped leaves – which in many cultivated forms such as 'Marmoratum' are heavily veined with cream or silver – emerge from the ground in fall or early winter and persist through spring. Minute flowers are borne on a yellow club-like protuberance ("spadix") in late spring, which is hooded by a greenish-yellow leaf-like bract ("spathe"). Knobby...