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Plants Matching bulb or corm or tuber

Returned 1692 results. Page 125 of 170.

(Spiderlily, White Spiderlily)

This highly ornamental genus is made up of approximately 15 to 20 beautiful lily-flowered ornamentals. These bulbous perennials are members of the Amaryllis family and exist in temperate regions from the Middle East to China and Japan.

The great majority have a temporal separation between the time they produce foliage and the time when they flower. More specifically, most put forth dense clumps of strap-like foliage in the spring or early summer, which quickly disappears. The flowers appear on...

Image of Lycoris aurea photo by: Peggy Greb, USDA

Peggy Greb, USDA

(Golden Hurricane Lily, Golden Spiderlily, Spiderlily)

Magnificent when in bloom and sure to grab the attention of garden visitors, golden spiderlily offers lovely golden yellow lily-like flowers in autumn. This late-season bulb is native to China where it grows in open areas with calcareous soils close to limestone bedrock. The green, strap-like leaves appear in fall, winter or spring, but die away by early summer and remain dormant through the hot, dry summer. The flowering season begins at the beginning of fall when temperatures grow cooler.

Flower...

Image of Lycoris chinensis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Golden Surprise Lily, Kuko, Spiderlily)

Blooming in late summer or early fall, the golden surprise lily produces four to six large, medium yellow to golden-orange flowers in a cluster atop smooth leafless stems that rise from the ground. The curious petals/tepals are slender and curled like streamers. This hardy surprise lily is native to the mixed forests of China and adjacent South Korea where it grows on moist, partially shaded slopes.

Fountain-like clumps of smooth, strap-shaped leaves appear in late winter or spring and die...

(Peppermint Spiderlily, Spiderlily)

Named for its striped white and violet-red flowers, this hardy bulbous perennial is native to mountain slopes across Hubei and Yunnan in south-central China. The delicate flowers bloom in fall and are just as pretty as those of the more commonly planted pink surprise lily but are rarer in commerce.

The green, strap-like leaves appear in early spring but die away by early summer. The flowering season begins around the autumnal equinox. Each flower scape has four to six, trumpet-shaped, white...

Image of Lycoris longituba photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Spiderlily, White Spiderlily)

Producing clusters of long, trumpet-shaped flowers of white to palest yellow or faint pink on tall leafless stems, white spiderlily lends bright neutral color and interest to the late summer garden. This hardy bulbous perennial is native to the east-central Chinese province of Jiangsu where it grows in moist, shady locations along mountain slopes at lower elevations.

Clumps of green, strap-like leaves appear anytime from midwinter to spring, but die away in early summer. The flowering season...

Image of Lycoris radiata photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Red Spiderlily, Spiderlily)

Widely grown in the southern United States for its late-season display of fiery flowers, red spiderlily is a Japanese summer bulb first introduced to the West more than 200 years ago. In late summer or early fall, four to six large, crimson-red, spidery blooms crown sturdy, leafless, knee-high stems. The flowers have six wavy, recurved petals (tepals) with long, upswept, whisker-like stamens at their centers. Hummingbirds and insect pollinators are drawn to the flowers. After blooming, the bulbs...

Image of Lycoris sanguinea photo by: ISAKA Yoji (Cory), Wikimedia Commons Contributor

ISAKA Yoji (Cory), Wikimedia Commons Contributor

(Orange Spiderlily, Orange Surprise Lily, Spiderlily)

Rather short in stature when displaying orange flowers in midsummer, the orange spiderlily is among the earliest flowering species in the Lycoris genus. This bulbous perennial is native to Japan. Appearing in a cluster atop naked stems are four to six pink flowers, each with six petals (tepals) with stamens at their centers. Some plants' flowers are notably red-orange, while others produce softer peach-salmon blooms. Hummingbirds and insect pollinators are drawn to the flowers. The green,...

(Electric Blue Spiderlily, Small Pink Spiderlily)

Shorter in stature with smaller leaves than other Lycoris, the small pink spiderlily is revered for its pink to lavender-blue very late summertime flowers. This bulbous perennial is native to open forests and bamboo stands of southeastern China where it grows in moist, often shaded, locations. It is less commonly cultivated than the taller Lycoris squamigera but it's equally pretty and garden-worthy.

Producing a clump of green, strap-like leaves in very early spring, the flowerless...

Image of Lycoris squamigera photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Magic Lily, Naked Ladies, Spiderlily, Surprise Lily)

Surprise lily is a hardy bulb from Japan that sends up fragrant, rosy-pink flowers in mid to late summer long after the strap-like leaves have disappeared. Each tall flowering stem bears as many as eight large trumpet-shaped blooms, whose amaryllis-like appearance belies this bulb's cold-hardiness. The leaves emerge in early spring, months after the flower stems have withered. In mild winter regions, leaves can appear in fall or winter.

Plant this adaptable bulb during its summer dormant season...

(Spiderlily, Straw-Yellow Spiderlily)

One of the rarer species of spiderlily, the straw-yellow spiderlily bears dirty beige to pale tan-yellow flowers in late summer to early autumn. This bulbous perennial is native to shady slopes in China's east-central provinces of Jiangsu and Zhejiang. Appearing in a cluster atop naked stems are four to six pink flowers, each with six petals (tepals) with long, upcurving stamens at their centers. The tepals recurve and have pink midveins along with pink specks. Hummingbirds and insect pollinators...