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Plants Matching bulb or corm or tuber

Returned 1692 results. Page 37 of 170.

Image of Colchicum autumnale

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Autumn Crocus, Meadow Saffron, Naked Ladies)

Like a welcome surprise, the lavender-pink, goblet-shaped flowers of autumn crocus pop up from the ground to confirm that summer has truly ended. The common name is misleading, though the flowers of this hardy "bulb" do superficially resemble crocuses, colchicums are not related to the genus Crocus.

Native from southern and western Europe to Russia, autumn crocus grows from plump corms (condensed underground stems) with papery tunics. In spring, these send up decorative large lance-shaped...

Image of Colchicum autumnale

International Flower Bulb Centre

(Autumn Crocus, Meadow Saffron, Naked Ladies)

Popping its white, goblet-shaped flowers up from the ground in early autumn, this cheerful hardy "bulb" is certain to brighten the garden. Native to Europe and western Russia, it grows from plump corms (condensed underground stems) covered with papery tunics. They send up large lance-shaped green leaves in spring, which provide nourishment to the corm before withering and disappearing in late spring. In the waning days of very late summer or early autumn, white flowers on long white tubes emerge...

(Autumn Crocus, Meadow Saffron, Naked Ladies)

One of the relatively few hardy "bulbs" to bloom late in the growing season, this cheerful perennial plant is certain to brighten the garden. A native of southeastern Europe, it grows from small globular corms (condensed underground stems) covered with papery tunics. The decorative, lance-shaped green leaves appear in early spring, providing nourishment for the corm before withering in late spring. In late summer, white buds emerge from the ground, maturing to deep reddish-purple flowers that create...

(Autumn Crocus, Naked Ladies)

One of the relatively few hardy "bulbs" to bloom late in the growing season, this European native is certain to brighten any garden. Its double-flowered cultivar 'Pleniflorum' bears numerous lavender-pink, starburst blooms in late summer.

Plump corms (condensed underground stems) covered with papery tunics send up large lance-shaped green leaves in early spring, which provide nourishment to the corm before withering and disappearing in early summer. In the waning days of summer, the flowers emerge...

Image of Colchicum byzantinum photo by: Debbie Schilling

Debbie Schilling

(Byzantine Meadow Saffron)

Prized for its lilac-pink flowers that appear in late summer rather than in spring like those of most other "bulbs," this hardy perennial is a natural hybrid of Colchicum autumnale and Colchicum cilicicum. Native to Asia Minor, it has been known in gardens since the sixteenth century. Although sometimes called "autumn crocus," it is not related to the genus Crocus, which is in the iris family.

This plant produces large broad strap-shaped leaves in spring, which gather...

Image of Colchicum cilicicum photo by: Debbie Schilling

Debbie Schilling

(Autumn Crocus)

Heralding the waning of summer's grasp, Colchicum cilicicum produces round-petaled flowers of fuchsia-rose without any leaves present. The common name is misleading, though the flowers of this hardy "bulb" do superficially resemble crocuses, colchicums are not related to the genus Crocus.

Native from the western Mediterranean from Turkey southward to Syria and Lebanon, this species of autumn crocus grows from plump corms (condensed underground stems) with papery tunics. In...

Image of Colchicum cilicicum

Russell Stafford

(Autumn Crocus)

Rounded petals of a violet-fuchsia greet the waning days of summer on the 'Purpureum' selection of Colchicum cilicicum. The common name is misleading, though the flowers of this hardy "bulb" do superficially resemble crocuses, colchicums are not related to the genus Crocus.

Hailing from Turkey southward to Syria and Lebanon, this species of autumn crocus grows from plump corms (condensed underground stems) with papery tunics. In spring, these send up decorative small lance-shaped...

Image of Colchicum giganteum photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Giant Autumn Crocus)

Prized for its rosy-purple flowers that appear in late summer and early fall rather than in spring like those of most other "bulbs," this hardy perennial is native to northern Turkey. It has been known in gardens since the late nineteenth century. Although sometimes called "autumn crocus," it is not related to the genus Crocus, which is in the iris family.

This plant produces large broad strap-shaped leaves in spring, which gather energy for the underground bulb-like storage organ, known...

(Yellow Meadow Saffron)

Yellow meadow saffron is one of the most exquisite and uncommon spring flowering bulbs. This petite perennial from Afghanistan, northern India and Tibet grows from a small bulb-like corm. Its bright yellow flower buds arise on stalk-like tubes in late winter, emerging just after the green lance-shaped leaves. The floral tube usually has reddish-brown blushing which continues into the lowest part of the petal-like flower segments. Each corm can produce up to four small, goblet-shaped blossoms. The...

Image of Colchicum speciosum photo by: TL

TL

(Giant Meadow Saffron)

One of the largest and showiest colchicums, this perennial from uplands of southwestern Asia bears its lilac-purple, white-eyed blooms in late summer. Although sometimes called "autumn crocus," it is not related to the genus Crocus, which is in the iris family.

This plant produces large broad strap-shaped leaves in spring, which gather energy for the underground bulb-like storage organ, known as a corm. After the leaves wither in late spring, the corm quietly waits until late summer...