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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 10 of 52.

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe plicatilis photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Fan Aloe)

The succulent, strap-shaped, evergreen leaves of this tree-like aloe are paired in opposite fan-like ranks, in dramatic contrast to the spiral rosettes of most other aloes. This native of the West Cape region of South Africa is also coveted for its tall, multi-stemmed habit and for its showy spikes of bright flowers in late winter. The numerous tall spires of tubular orange-red or yellow blooms lure hummingbirds in droves. In its native haunts it is pollinated by sunbirds.

This beautiful...

Image of Aloe polyphylla photo by: John Rickard

John Rickard

(Kroonaalwyn, Spiral Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe reitzii photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Aloe)

This bold aloe naturally occurs in the dry grasslands of Mpumalanga, a rocky, hilly province in northeastern South Africa. In its native area, it is quite rare but easily distinguished by its smooth, blue-green leaves and erect, orange-red flower spikes that are produced in the summer. Unlike many other desirable garden aloes, this one is tolerant of limited frost.

The thick, waxy leaves of Reitz' aloe are smooth but edged with slightly barbed teeth that are sometimes reddish brown. They are...

Image of Aloe striata photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Coral Aloe, Striped Aloe)

The large, uniform rosettes of coral aloe are comprised of thick, smooth leaves with toothless margins. These are silvery gray-green and produce showy spikes of coral orange flowers from late winter to spring. This standout succulent originates from South Africa where it inhabits open, dry, rocky, hilly locales.

Coral aloe develops a substantial rosette of broad, thick, pointed leaves that are entirely smooth. These are silvery gray-green and some variants have thin, dark, longitudinal lines,...

Image of Aloe thraskii photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Thrask's Aloe)

A striking specimen plant for mild climates, this stately aloe forms a single-stemmed, palm-like "tree." Native to coastal dunes of eastern South Africa, it bears a large rosette of long, strap-shaped, evergreen leaves atop a "trunk" that can reach house-high. The olive-green, arching leaves have channeled centers and red-toothed margins. The shaggy remains of old leaves often cloak the upper "trunk." Conical clusters of tubular orange-yellow flowers appear in branching candelabra-like spikes in...

Image of Aloe variegata photo by: Mark Kane

Mark Kane

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe vera photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Aloe Vera, Barbados Aloe)

True aloe is an outstanding ornamental succulent that is cultivated outdoors, where winters are frost-free, and indoors as a potted plant for sunny exposures. It is believed to have originated from northwestern Africa to the Arabian Peninsula, but because of a long history of widespread human distribution its true nativity is unknown.

This clump forming succulent plant produces rigid upright rosettes of light green, thick, lance-like leaves edged with tiny yellow teeth. If broken, they emit...

Image of Aloe zanzibarica photo by: Altman Plants

Altman Plants

(Zanzibar Aloe)

This is a little jewel box aloe that is at home in frost free gardens, pots on the porch or indoors where there is bright light. As its name suggests, this ground hugging Aloe originates from the dry climates of Zanzibar, a small island off the coast of Tanzania.

Zanzibar aloe develops little upright rosettes that elongate over time and travel horizontally, rooting as they go. In addition, it produces lateral plantlets, or pups, over time to form colonies. Sometimes the original point...

Image of Aloe zebrina photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...