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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 13 of 52.

(Cereus, Night-blooming Cactus)

While grown for its nocturnal flowers, Cereus aethiops displays an attractive bluish stem with starry black spine clusters. It is native to central South America, primarily in northern Argentina, but also into nearby southern Brazil and Paraguay.

This upright, columnar cactus rarely branches and has clusters of long black spines. There are no leaves, but the attractive green-blue, eight-ribbed stem photosynthesizes sunlight. In winter or in intense sunlight, the stem blushes lavender...

(Cereus, Night-blooming Cactus)

White to lavender, trumpet-shaped flowers grace the skeletal stems of Cereus albicaulis. It is native to eastern Brazil, especially in the state of Bahia, although relatively rare in the wild. It may grow upright, but tends to lean and arch over nearby vegetation.

This shrubby, open and coarse-branching cactus has starry clusters of long gray spines. There are no leaves, but the slender, sprawling light green stems photosynthesize sunlight. Each stem has four or five vertical ribs....

(Cereus, Night-blooming Cactus)

Small white trumpet-shaped flowers grace the skinny, spined stems of Cereus amazonicus. It is native to the arid highlands in the upper Amazon River basin, in Bolivia and Peru.

This tree-like, coarse-branching cactus has starry clusters of short spines. There are no leaves, but the slender, upright green stems photosynthesize sunlight. Each has seven to nine vertical ribs. Its small white flowers are tubular, many petaled and night blooming, though they will remain open up until the...

(Cereus, Night-blooming Cactus)

Small white trumpet-shaped flowers grace the skinny, spined stems of Cereus apoloensis. It is native to the arid highlands from Bolivia and Peru southward across southwestern Brazil into northern Argentina.

This tree-like, coarse-branching cactus has starry clusters of short spines. There are no leaves, but the slender, upright green stems photosynthesize sunlight. Each has seven to nine vertical ribs. Its small white flowers are tubular, many petaled and night blooming, though they...

(Cereus, Night-blooming Cactus)

This is among the oldest botanical names used for cactus, which first appeared in 1754. It was used to group all newly discovered upright branching types with distinctive ribs. Beginning as a catch-all genus, it was later split into other genera or its species moved there as more information was obtained about these unique New World succulents. As a result, older references to these cacti are almost always incorrect. Today there are about 25 species in the genus

Cereus produce very...

Image of Cereus glaucus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Cereus, Night-blooming Cactus)

This is among the oldest botanical names used for cactus, which first appeared in 1754. It was used to group all newly discovered upright branching types with distinctive ribs. Beginning as a catch-all genus, it was later split into other genera or its species moved there as more information was obtained about these unique New World succulents. As a result, older references to these cacti are almost always incorrect. Today there are about 25 species in the genus

Cereus produce very...

Image of Cereus hildmannianus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Hedge Cactus, Night-blooming Cactus, Peruvian Apple Cactus, Queen-of-the-Night)

The Peruvian apple cactus is a widely adapted, tree-like cactus that produces beautiful, edible fruit. It is native to central South America but its exact area of origin is debated because it was cultivated and distributed by indigenous peoples early on.

This is a highly variable species, which may bear large spines or almost none along its eight vertical ribs. There are no leaves, but the green stems photosynthesize sunlight. Its large, green and white flowers are tubular, many petaled and...

(Night-blooming Cactus, Peruvian Apple Cactus)

The Peruvian apple cactus is a widely adapted, tree-like cactus that produces beautiful, edible fruit. It is native to central South America but its exact area of origin is debated because it was cultivated and distributed by indigenous peoples early on.

This is a highly variable species, which may bear large spines or almost none along its eight vertical ribs. There are no leaves, but the green stems photosynthesize sunlight. Its large, green and white flowers are tubular, many petaled and...

Image of Cereus jamacaru photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Mandacaru, Night-blooming Cactus, Pleated Cereus)

While grown for its foot-long (30 cm) nocturnal flowers, mandacarĂº is a large-growing, tree-like cactus. It is native to northeastern Brazil and is quite variable in form, size and presence of spines. Grow it as a houseplant when young, but expect it to become a huge, heavy plant specimen.

MandacarĂº is a rather fast growing and upright with numerous vertical branches. There are no leaves, but the green stems photosynthesize sunlight. There are four to six ribs on each stem, and clusters of yellow...

Image of Cereus stenogonus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Candelabra Tuna Cactus, Night-blooming Cactus, Rose Cereus)

Nine-inch-long (22 cm), rosy pink, trumpet-shaped flowers grace the skinny, upright stems on Cereus stenogonus. This succulent cactus is native to the arid Chaco highlands of Paraguay and northern Argentina. It develops a thicket of vertical, slender stems, much like a cluster of pipes or flagpoles.

This tree-like cactus has two to three spines in clusters on the four or five ribbed stems. There are no leaves, but the slender, upright pale to blue-green stems photosynthesize sunlight....