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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 23 of 52.

Image of Echinocereus brandegeei photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Casa de Ratas, Strawberry Cactus)

Cloaked in the most ferocious spines, this low spreading cactus adapts to most warm, arid climates. It is native to a relatively small area of Mexico, the Baja California peninsula and isolated islands in the Gulf of California. In all these areas conditions are exceptionally hot and dry, but moderated by the marine influence, making its preferential climate difficult to recreate in cultivation. This is a low spreading form known as casa de ratas

Image of Echinocereus engelmannii photo by: maureen Gilmer

maureen Gilmer

(Calico Cactus, Engelmann's Hedgehog Cactus, Hedgehog Cactus)

Cloaked in ferocious spines, this low spreading cactus is so adaptable it can be grown just about anywhere in the American southwest and even some states further north. This beautiful mounding cactus is from the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, with populations occurring from sea level up to very alpine locations. It varies widely across its native range, resulting in the naming of several subspecies and varieties.

Engelman’s cactus is composed of many cylindrical stems...

Image of Echinocereus enneacanthus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Banana Cactus, Cob Cactus, Green Strawberry Hedgehog, Prostrate Hedgehog, Strawberry Cactus, Strawberry Hedgehog)

This clumping cactus is a signature plant of the Rio Grande Valley of Texas where it grows in great abundance. It is also found in New Mexico and into Northern Mexico where it prefers rocky low hills or slopes where drainage is extreme. They are most common beneath the filtering shade of native shrubs and woody perennials that act as nurse plants for the developing seedlings. The stems of these low branching plants can produce up 3 to 60 stems although very old specimens in the wild are recorded...

Image of Echinocereus pectinatus photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Arizona Rainbow Hedgehog, Lace Cactus, Rainbow Cactus)

This is the most widely grown Echinocereus due to its small size and minimal spines. It’s found throughout the American Southwest into northern Mexico. This beautiful little cactus is found in rocky uplands where soils are poor and drainage assured. It typically produces just one stem about the diameter of a soda bottle bearing 12 to 23 subtle ribs with low tubercles. At each horny areole rise 1 to 5 central spines and 12 to 30 radial spines. These are so densely held the spines naturally...

Image of Echinocereus reichenbachii photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Hardy Hedgehog Cactus, Lace Hedgehog Cactus, Reichenbach's Hedgehog Cactus)

Fabulous flowers and a short, tidy habit make this a highly rewarding cactus for containers and rockeries. Rare in the wild, it occurs in dry, rocky scrub and grasslands from southeastern Colorado to northern Mexico. It is noted and named for its interlacing, starry clusters of stem-hugging, flattened spines.

The small, upright, football shaped stems of lace hedgehog cactus are initially single. Over time they produce pups and create clumps. Mature stems produce lots of striking pink, lavender-pink...

Image of Echinocereus triglochidiatus photo by: maureen Gilmer

maureen Gilmer

(Claret Cup Cactus, Kings Crown Cactus, Strawberry Cactus)

Low and heavily branched, this desert cactus is among the easiest to identify when in bloom. It is native to most of the American Southwest and Mexico where it is found in both low and high desert conditions. These very low branched plants can produce up to 500 stems overall in a well-matured wild specimen. They are blue green, composed of 5 to 12 ribs. Each areole produces 1 to 4 central spines, and may have no radial spines to as many as 22. Very old plants reach the diameter of a compact car tire...

Image of Echinocereus triglochidiatus ssp. mojavensis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Mojave Hedgehog Cactus)

Low and heavily branched, this desert cactus is among the easiest to identify when in bloom. It is native to most of the American Southwest and Mexico where it is found in both low and high desert conditions. These very low branched plants can produce up to 500 stems overall in a well-matured wild specimen. They are blue green, composed of 5 to 12 ribs. Each areole produces 1 to 4 central spines, and may have no radial spines to as many as 22. Very old plants reach the diameter of a compact car tire...

Image of Echinopsis photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Echinopsis)

Famous for its large, outstanding flowers, this sizable genus of South American cacti includes about 128 species. It is spread over a very large range to include Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. There are some American botanists who have retired the genus Trichocereus and lumped all of its species into Echinopsis, significantly enlarging its size. However, the Europeans have resisted such a move and references from the Old World have retained the original...

Image of Echinopsis candicans photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Argentine Giant)

This fine clumping cactus for landscaping is equally suited to container cultivation indoors or out. It is native to northern Argentina where plants are widely adaptable to a wide range of exposures. The plant is composed of many stems that originate at the base of the plant which can grow to a very large crown at maturity. These may stand upright or lie procumbent with slightly upturned tips. Each stem, about the diameter of a baseball bat is dark green, averaging 9 to 11 sharp edged ridges which...

(Peanut Cactus)

Famous for its large, outstanding flowers, this sizable genus of South American cacti includes about 128 species. It is spread over a very large range to include Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. There are some American botanists who have retired the genus Trichocereus and lumped all of its species into Echinopsis, significantly enlarging its size. However, the Europeans have resisted such a move and references from the Old World have retained the original...