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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 24 of 52.

Image of Echinopsis chiloensis photo by: John Rickard

John Rickard

(Quisco)

Famous for its large, outstanding flowers, this sizable genus of South American cacti includes about 128 species. It is spread over a very large range to include Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. There are some American botanists who have retired the genus Trichocereus and lumped all of its species into Echinopsis, significantly enlarging its size. However, the Europeans have resisted such a move and references from the Old World have retained the original...

Image of Echinopsis huascha photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Red Torch Cactus)

Good size overall and abundant flowers make this a superior choice for both container gardens and desert landscaping. It is native to northern Argentina where plants are widely adaptable to a wide range of exposures. The plant is composed of many stems that originate at the base, standing upright at the center and growing more procumbent around the edges of the clump. Each stem, about the diameter of a baseball bat is dark green, averaging 14 to 17 low rounded ridges, which bear areoles from which...

Image of Echinopsis oxygona photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Easter Lily Cactus)

Famous for its large, outstanding flowers, this sizable genus of South American cacti includes about 128 species. It is spread over a very large range to include Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. There are some American botanists who have retired the genus Trichocereus and lumped all of its species into Echinopsis, significantly enlarging its size. However, the Europeans have resisted such a move and references from the Old World have retained the original...

(San Pedro)

Famous for its large, outstanding flowers, this sizable genus of South American cacti includes about 128 species. It is spread over a very large range to include Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. There are some American botanists who have retired the genus Trichocereus and lumped all of its species into Echinopsis, significantly enlarging its size. However, the Europeans have resisted such a move and references from the Old World have retained the original...

(Golden Torch)

Famous for its large, outstanding flowers, this sizable genus of South American cacti includes about 128 species. It is spread over a very large range to include Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. There are some American botanists who have retired the genus Trichocereus and lumped all of its species into Echinopsis, significantly enlarging its size. However, the Europeans have resisted such a move and references from the Old World have retained the original...

Image of Echinopsis subdenudata photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Easter Lily Cactus)

Famous for its large, outstanding flowers, this sizable genus of South American cacti includes about 128 species. It is spread over a very large range to include Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. There are some American botanists who have retired the genus Trichocereus and lumped all of its species into Echinopsis, significantly enlarging its size. However, the Europeans have resisted such a move and references from the Old World have retained the original...

Image of Escobaria photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Escobaria)

This genus of small cacti contains about 17 species often confused with those of Mamnillaria and Coryphantha because the two groups are quite similar in size and spination. They all originate in the same regions of the desert Southwest into northern Mexico with a single species found only in Cuba. Escobaria enjoys a much larger range extending northward into southern Canada.

The low growing globular plants occur alone or clustered, with stems becoming elongated with...

Image of Escobaria missouriensis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Missouri Foxtail Cactus, Yellow Pincushion Cactus)

This genus of small cacti contains about 17 species often confused with those of Mamnillaria and Coryphantha because the two groups are quite similar in size and spination. They all originate in the same regions of the desert Southwest into northern Mexico with a single species found only in Cuba. Escobaria enjoys a much larger range extending northward into southern Canada.

The low growing globular plants occur alone or clustered, with stems becoming elongated with...

Image of Escobaria vivipara photo by: Barbara Beasley, US Forest Service

Barbara Beasley, US Forest Service

(Arizona Beehive, Arizona Spinystar, Bisquit Cactus, Showy Pincushion)

This genus of small cacti contains about 17 species often confused with those of Mamnillaria and Coryphantha because the two groups are quite similar in size and spination. They all originate in the same regions of the desert Southwest into northern Mexico with a single species found only in Cuba. Escobaria enjoys a much larger range extending northward into southern Canada.

The low growing globular plants occur alone or clustered, with stems becoming elongated with...

Image of Euphorbia ammak photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Spurge)

This remarkable tree-sized, branching succulent is a coveted landscape plant in arid, frost free regions. Originating from Saudi Arabia and Yemen, it is common in southern Africa where it was introduced long ago by traders, but is now listed as a threatened species in its native habitat.

Forming a branched, candelabra-like outline, this thorny succulent superficially resembles a cactus, but is not actually related to them. Its needle-like barbs are borne on vertical ridges that divide its...