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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 26 of 52.

Image of Euphorbia pseudocactus photo by: John Rickard

John Rickard

(Candelabra Spurge, Lucky Cowboy, Tiger Tree)

With lots of spines and coarse branching, the candelabra spurge is both visually striking and intimidating in an arid garden. This rather fast-growing, short succulent plant is native to the subtropical coast of South Africa. It's frost sensitive. Very healthy, robust plants are many-stemmed and create a wide clump that looks like underwater coral tubes.

Instead of having leaves, the candelabra spurge conserves moisture in milky sap in its colorful stems. Each stark, upright stem is green with...

Image of Euphorbia tirucalli photo by: Carol Cloud Bailey

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Finger Plant, Indian Tree Spurge, Pencil Plant)

The pencil tree is well known around the world where it was grown a half century ago as a wartime experiment for rubber production. While these early plantations failed commercial viability, the plants remained behind to naturalize in other dry regions of the globe. Even in Africa its point of origin, probably coastal Mozambique, is cloudy. The value of pencil trees as living livestock enclosures led native peoples to spread the plants throughout much of arid south and east Africa.

Pencil tree...

Image of Euphorbia tirucalli

Felder Rushing

(Finger Plant, Indian Tree Spurge, Pencil Plant, Sticks-on-Fire Spurge)

This brilliantly colored succulent is beloved by modern landscape designers who use its fiery color for accent and focal point. 'Sticks-on-Fire' develops its best hues during short days of winter provided it is grown in full sun. The origin of its green parent species is probably coastal Mozambique, with this strongly tinted variety is a contemporary selection. This coloration reduces chlorophyll, which stunts these plants to less than a third of its parent.

'Sticks-on-fire", commonly called...

Image of Euphorbia virosa photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Gifboom, Poisoned Tree)

Wickedly barbed and packed with caustic sap, this uncommon species may be the most ferocious Euphorbia of all. It hails from the heart of southern Africa, inhabiting an enormous desert range from the Orange River to deep in southern Angola. Well known by Bushmen tribes, the white latex sap of the plant is used to poison the tips of their tiny arrows. The plant produces a single many-ribbed gray green stem that branches into short arms. In the wild it can also become a clump of basal branches...

Image of Ferocactus photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Barrel Cactus)

Genus Ferocactus contains the primary desert barrel cactus of the North American deserts. It contains 29 species which are either round or columnar in shape. Its range spans most of the arid regions of the American Southwest, dipping down into northern and central Mexico. They are also common in the Baja California peninsula where conditions are extremely arid.

The genus is named from the Latin, ferox, which means wild or fierce. Recent DNA testing has linked this genus...

Image of Ferocactus cylindraceus photo by: maureen Gilmer

maureen Gilmer

(California Barrel Cactus, Desert Barrel Cactus)

The desert barrel cactus is so densely covered in small and large spines on its vertical ribs that you'd never know the underlying green stem-trunk is photosynthesizing sunlight. This slow-growing, upright, succulent evergreen perennial occurs on gravelly or sandy soil across the American Desert Southwest and into Mexico's Sonora and Baja California. This species is often misleadingly and erroneously called the compass barrel cactus, as it's confused with another species from this same region.

The...

Image of Ferocactus cylindraceus ssp. cylindraceus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Barrel Cactus , California Fire Barrel Cactus)

The desert barrel cactus is so densely covered in small and large spines on its vertical ribs that you'd never know the underlying green stem-trunk is photosynthesizing sunlight. This slow-growing, upright, succulent evergreen perennial occurs on gravelly or sandy soil across the American Desert Southwest and into Mexico's Sonora and Baja California. This species is often misleadingly and erroneously called the compass barrel cactus, as it's confused with another species from this same region.

The...

Image of Ferocactus emoryi photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Colville's Barrel Cactus, Emory's Barrel Cactus)

Known as Colville's or Emory's barrel cactus, this spined, succulent evergreen perennial occurs on gravelly or sandy soil in Sonoran Desert scrublands: across southwestern Arizona and the northern Mexican state of Sonora. It slowly develops into a rounded or cylindrical "barrel" with numerous ribs lined with clusters of fearsome spines. Mature plants typically reach thigh height, but up to shoulder height isn't out of the question over many decades. The long, stiff spines are usually a shade of gray,...

Image of Ferocactus glaucescens photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Blue Barrel Cactus, Glaucous Barrel Cactus)

The blue barrel cactus develops into a globe-shaped mass with tidy, star-like clusters of long spines. Rather than its succulent stem being green, it has a powdery gray (glaucous) film, making it look bluish. This slow-growing, succulent evergreen perennial is native to east-central Mexico, especially across the state of Hidalgo. With time, basal suckers (new plants) emerge from the base, eventually creating a mounding colony of round cacti.

This cactus has 11 to 15 vertical ribs. On the ridge...

Image of Ferocactus rectispinus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Long-spined Barrel Cactus, Straight Spine Barrel)

One of the showiest barrel cacti, this species long and colorful spines are wickedly intimidating but beautiful. The long-spined barrel cactus is a slow-growing, succulent evergreen perennial that's native to the coastal cliffs in Mexico's Baja California. When young, it is globe-shaped, but will become a stout cylinder after many decades (as tall as an adult man). Some botanists regard it as a subspecies of Emory's barrel cactus (Ferocactus emoryi).

This cactus has 15 to 21 vertical...