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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 28 of 52.

Image of Gasteria croucheri photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Gasteria, Natal beestong)

The succulent foliage clumps of Natal beestong are grayish green, relatively large and attractive, but the flowers are only subtly pretty and not as stunning at those of other Gasteria species. It is native to the eastern Cape of South Africa where it naturally exists on rocky hillsides, cliff faces with sandstone rock formations and rocky valleys, often under the cover of scrub and open shrubs. Like most Gasteria, it is slow-growing and forms pleasing clumps of plantlets over time....

Image of Gymnocalycium photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Gymnocalycium)

The genus Gymnocalycium includes up to 71 species of cactus all originating in South America. They are more specifically found east of the Andes in Bolivia, southern Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. These cacti prefer warmer climates, won’t stand much frost, and many prove far more tolerant of shade than others of its kind. This adaptation to shaded conditions make Gymnocalycium one of the better choices for houseplants and windowsill gardens. Rather than merely tolerating...

Image of Gymnocalycium multiflorum photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Many-flowered Gymnocalycium)

Pale golden spines and large, white flowers are the ornamental highlights of the many-flowered chin cactus. This perennial cactus species is native to the arid grassy highlands in north-central Argentina. Although a tidy globe in shape when young, older specimens become elongated, growing into erect columns or flopping to the ground with an erect growing tip. Over decades, one plant multiplies into a clump of many stems.

Instead of foliage, cacti modified their leaves to become protective spines...

Image of Gymnocalycium saglionis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Chin Cactus)

This easy-to-grow cactus bears soft pink flowers and presents a tidy, green sphere for potted gardens. Chin cactus is native to northern Argentina and is believed to be tolerant of occasional light frost. That makes it a great candidate for outdoor potted collections and in-ground rock gardens. The species bears the unique depressed center typical of the genus. There are from 10 to 30 ribs, with prominent rounded tubercles. From the areoles spring dirty yellow spines which may vary in color to nearly...

(Hatiora)

This diverse family of succulents is comprised of approximately 90 genera and thousands of species. All are native throughout the New World from North to South America and throughout the West Indies. They are characterized by beautiful densely petaled flowers with whorls of stamens that come in an array of bright colors, such as yellow, red, pink, magenta, white and orange. These attract a wide variety of pollinators, depending on the species, such as birds, bats, moths and bees. Many plants are...

Image of Hatiora gaertneri photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Holiday Cactus)

The holiday cactus is named for the season of its bloom as well as its luminescent red or magenta flowers which make it a popular gift plant. It is a unique species native to the jungles of southern Brazil. Natural populations are epiphytic, which means plants live in the trees. They prefer the crotches between tree branches where organic matter and moisture accumulate. Its preferred habitat is similar to that of many orchids.

The foliage of this succulent is much like that of a typical Christmas...

Image of Hatiora salicornioides photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Dancing Bones Cactus, Drunkard's Dream)

Hatiora salicornioides is a shrubby, epiphytic (tree-dwelling) cactus with spineless, upright to arching, pencil-thin stems. The stem segments resemble tiny bottles, hence the common name "drunkard's dream." This popular houseplant is native to tropical forests of southeastern Brazil, where it grows in the angles of tree branches and on rock ledges.

The leafless, freely branching, olive-green stems of this cactus are divided into many segments. The stems ascend and then arch, giving...

Image of Haworthia photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Haworthia)

Comprising about 70 species of small, succulent, cold-tender perennials, this southern African genus contains many excellent subjects for containers or frost-free gardens. Most cultivated haworthias come from arid or semi-desert regions of South Africa that receive little or no summer rainfall.

Most Haworthia species form ground-hugging or short-stemmed rosettes of fleshy, somewhat triangular, firm- or soft-textured leaves. The leaves of several species (including H. cymbiformis)...

(Rough-spined Haworthia)

A leathery, fleshy rosette with ivory, spider leg-like spines describes the rough-spined haworthia. A frost-tender perennial succulent, it is native to the Western Cape province of South Africa. It grows in arid habitats, usually protected from intense sun rays under the branches of shrubs. Rough-spined haworthia slowly develops into a small cluster of rosettes after many years.

The rosette comprises dozens or scores of pointed succulent green leaves. Each is lined with white to tan, sparse spines...

Image of Haworthia arachnoidea var. xiphiophylla photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Haworthia, Rough-spined Haworthia)

A leathery, fleshy rosette with ivory, spider leg-like spines describes the rough-spined haworthia. A frost-tender perennial succulent, it is native to the Western Cape province of South Africa. It grows in arid habitats, usually protected from intense sun rays under the branches of shrubs. Rough-spined haworthia slowly develops into a small cluster of rosettes after many years.

The rosette comprises dozens or scores of pointed succulent green leaves. Each is lined with white to tan, sparse spines...