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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 31 of 52.

Image of Heurnia pillansii photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Cocklebur, Lifesaver Plant)

This genus of carrion flowers contains about 60 to 70 species of tender succulent plants. They are primarily native to the deserts of Africa, more specifically to South Africa, Ethiopia and the Arabian peninsula. They tend to prefer very fast draining low fertility soils in somewhat protected locations of rocky hillsides which rarely retain much moisture but boulders offer protection from direct afternoon exposure.

All carrion flowers share the look and smell of a kill to draw flies, their...

Image of Heurnia thuretii photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Thuret's Heurnia)

This genus of carrion flowers contains about 60 to 70 species of tender succulent plants. They are primarily native to the deserts of Africa, more specifically to South Africa, Ethiopia and the Arabian peninsula. They tend to prefer very fast draining low fertility soils in somewhat protected locations of rocky hillsides which rarely retain much moisture but boulders offer protection from direct afternoon exposure.

All carrion flowers share the look and smell of a kill to draw flies, their...

Image of Heurnia zebrina photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Striped Heurnia)

This genus of carrion flowers contains about 60 to 70 species of tender succulent plants. They are primarily native to the deserts of Africa, more specifically to South Africa, Ethiopia and the Arabian peninsula. They tend to prefer very fast draining low fertility soils in somewhat protected locations of rocky hillsides which rarely retain much moisture but boulders offer protection from direct afternoon exposure.

All carrion flowers share the look and smell of a kill to draw flies, their...

Image of Hoodia photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Hoodia)

The genus Hoodia contains about 20 species of extremely drought tolerant succulent plants. They hail from dry southern Africa distributed over a very large range that includes Botswana, Angola, Namibia and South Africa. Some species have been used by the desert Bushmen for appetite suppression during exceptionally long hunt.

These succulents are composed of thick upright stems that occasionally branch, but more often originate at the base of the plant. The skin is typically blue green...

Image of Hoodia gordonii photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Hoodia)

A spiny succulent from the dry, sandy and rocky areas of southern Africa, Hoodia gordonii has been in the news lately. A low-growing perennial, this plant has long been used by the indigenous peoples in its native region. Hoodia was described in the 1700s and is now a threatened species were it originates.

When young, slow growing Hoodia usually produces a single, leafless, green angled stem covered with pointed tubercles. As the plants age, they grow faster and many...

Image of Hylocereus photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Hylocereus, Night-blooming Cactus)

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Image of Hylocereus costaricensis photo by: Edward, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

Edward, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

(Costa Rican Dragon Fruit, Night-blooming Cactus, Purple Pitaya, Strawberry Pear Cactus)

The Costa Rican dragon fruit is an intriguing succulent cactus for a variety of reasons. This plant grows in seasonally wet-to-dry, porous soils in tropical forests from Nicaragua to Panama. Even though it is ground-dwelling, the slender leafless stems flop and clamber as if a vine, gaining support from tree trunks, rocks or walls. This species is renowned for its large white nocturnal flowers that are very short-lived. They measure up to 12-inches long (30 cm) by 12-inches wide (30 cm). Following...

Image of Hylocereus undatus photo by: Mbz1, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

Mbz1, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

(Dragon Fruit Cactus, Night-blooming Cactus, Red Pitaya)

The red pitaya or dragon fruit cactus is both a beautiful flowering plant and a source of food. This plant grows in seasonally wet-to-dry, porous soils in tropical forests. Its precise native range is unknown, but possibly from southern Mexico to Costa Rica, and some believe it is also native to the West Indies. It grows either as an epiphyte (on another plant) or in the ground, but always in an organic rich, porous medium. The slender leafless stems flop and clamber as if a vine, gaining support...

Image of Isolatocereus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Isolatocereus)

This is a very unusual genus bearing just one species native to Mexico. In the 1990s, this newly formed genus contains the single species that has been previously reclassified many times in the 20th century. With recent DNA sequencing it was finally proven to be a unique individual. The plants are large candelabra forms that are found in such small isolated groupings that this would inspire the new genus name. They are exclusive to rocky hills and cliffs of central and southern Mexico.

Like...

Image of Isolatocereus dumortieri photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Candelabra)

This is a very unusual tree-sized branching cactus native to Mexico. They are exclusive to rocky hills and cliffs of central and southern regions with Oaxaca being the primary homeland. The plants are large candelabra forms that are found in small isolated groupings. Stems are inward curving and blue green with areoles concentrated on the sharp edges of the 5 to 8 ribs. Each areole contains 1 to 4 central spines and 6 to 9 radials, which grow darker with age.

This is a night blooming cactus...