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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 35 of 52.

(Texas Nipple Cactus)

The genus Mammillaria is enormous, containing at least 150 species and even more varieties, subspecies and naturally occurring hybrids. They are widely distributed across the arid regions of the Americas. A handful are cold tolerant but most exist where growing conditions are continually warm.

In general, Mammillaria are true cacti with rounded, fuzzy stems that spread slowly over time to form dense, upright clumps, though a few oddballs have fat, procumbent stems. Some have...

Image of Mammillaria prolifera ssp. haitiensis photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Haitian Nipple Cactus)

The genus Mammillaria is enormous, containing at least 150 species and even more varieties, subspecies and naturally occurring hybrids. They are widely distributed across the arid regions of the Americas. A handful are cold tolerant but most exist where growing conditions are continually warm.

In general, Mammillaria are true cacti with rounded, fuzzy stems that spread slowly over time to form dense, upright clumps, though a few oddballs have fat, procumbent stems. Some have...

(American Aloe, False Aloe)

Once considered an Agave, Manfreda virginica forms a lovely succulent rosette of smooth, waxy, sword-shaped leaves with undulating edges and sharp tips. A native of the southern and southeastern United States, it naturally inhabits rocky wooded areas and dry thickets where soils are somewhat sandy and alkaline. It is very common in the Ozark Mountains.

The evergreen to semi-evergreen rosettes of false aloe are bright waxy green. From late spring to summer rosettes produce 3...

Image of Manfreda virginica

Terra Nova Nurseries, Inc.

(American Aloe, False Aloe)

Interesting brownish burgundy spots decorate the undulating leaves of 'Spot.' These decorative spots have been known to diminish as plants age or revert away. Once named Agave virginica but relabeled Manfreda virginica, false aloe forms a lovely succulent rosette of smooth, waxy, sword-shaped leaves with undulating edges and sharp tips. A native of the southern and southeastern United States, it naturally inhabits rocky wooded areas and dry thickets where soils are somewhat sandy...

Image of Marginatocereus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Marginatocereus)

This diverse family of succulents is comprised of approximately 90 genera and thousands of species. All are native throughout the New World from North to South America and throughout the West Indies. They are characterized by beautiful densely petaled flowers with whorls of stamens that come in an array of bright colors, such as yellow, red, pink, magenta, white and orange. These attract a wide variety of pollinators, depending on the species, such as birds, bats, moths and bees. Many plants are...

Image of Marginatocereus marginatus photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Mexican Fence Post Cactus, Organ Cactus )

Fence post cactus is among the most easily identified, particularly when grown edge to edge as a living fence. Native to much of central Mexico, this quite lovely cactus shows more skin than most of its spinier relatives. As tall as a one story house, the straight, upright stems can reach significant diameter with age, as wide as a human hand. This cactus branches from the root, producing a clump of stems that rarely branch, making them a clean, upright fence-post like shape, hence the name. Areoles...

Image of Opuntia photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Pricklypear)

This genus is the most widely recognized in the Cactaceae due to the distinctive paddle shape of its stems. There are many species, subspecies and natural varieties of Opuntia. References differ greatly in the number of species, because the taxonomists that study them tend to be in disagreement, but the numbers range from 150 to 200. Many naturally hybridize in the wild, which makes the Opuntia hybridizer's job easy. Natural distribution stretches from the sunny sites of...

Image of Opuntia

Jessie Keith

(Hybrid Pricklypear)

This beautiful, compact, cold-hardy pricklypear was introduced by South Dakotan Claude Barr, a lifelong grower and advocate of hardy cacti. Probably a hybrid of Opuntia polyacantha, it forms dense compact clumps of small, flattened, cylindrical pads. In late spring and early summer it bears cup-shaped rose-pink flowers with a central flurry of golden stamens. Small, cylindrical, tan fruits follow the flowers. The pads - which superficially resemble leaves but are actually modified stem segments...

Image of Opuntia aciculata photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Chenille Pricklypear)

Don't let the warm fuzzy name of this small to medium-sized pricklypear cactus fool you into thinking that its tufted reddish whisker-like glochids are soft as chenille. It needs these barbed bristles (and its long, stout spines) to protect against hungry and thirsty browsing wildlife in its arid Texas and northern Mexican haunts. The spines are actually modified leaves and what appear to be leaves (and are treated as such below) are paddle shaped stem segments. In contrast, the cup-shaped yellow,...

Image of Opuntia aequatorialis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Ecuadorian Pricklypear)

Remarkably hardy considering it hails from Ecuador, this medium-sized pricklypear is likely a hybrid of Opuntia pubescens and O. soederstromiana. Its spreading or arching branches are composed of succulent oval pads bristling with clusters of formidable gray spines. Although they appear to be leaves (and are treated as such below), the pads are in fact swollen stem segments. The tops and sides of the pads produce yellow or orange bowl-shaped flowers that open from red buds in spring. Plump russet-red...