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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 37 of 52.

Image of Opuntia ficus-indica photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Barbary Fig, Pricklypear, Tuna Cactus)

The source of the supermarket prickly pear, this cactus bears strikingly beautiful bowl-shaped flowers and vivid red-purple fruit atop tall stems with round paddle-like segments. Plants grow to the size of a small tree or large shrub, usually with a woody "trunk." A long-cultivated plant that probably derives from one or more Mexican Opuntia species, Indian fig has naturalized in many other parts of the world including California, where it was introduced to missions as a living fence and...

Image of Opuntia fragilis photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Brittle Pricklypear)

Native from the central and western United States all the way to central Canada, this pricklypear dispels the myth that cacti are only for warm climates. It is a low, mat-forming species bearing small, cylindrical or flattened, spiny pads that are specially adapted to survive beneath snow or dead prairie grass. It is also adapted to alpine conditions and is often found growing on upland, rocky outcrops.

Although they appear to be succulent leaves, the pads are in fact swollen stem segments...

Image of Opuntia fragilis

Jessie Keith

(Brittle Pricklypear)

Native from the central and western United States all the way to central Canada, brittle pricklypear dispels the myth that cacti are only for warm climates. The cultivar 'Frankfurt' forms dense compact clumps of small, chubby, oval to cylindrical pads. In late spring and early summer it bears lemon-yellow flowers that fade to peach.

Brittle pricklypear is a low, mat-forming species bearing small, cylindrical or flattened, spiny pads that are specially adapted to survive beneath snow or dead...

Image of Opuntia fragilis

Jessie Keith

(Brittle Pricklypear)

Native from the central and western United States all the way to central Canada, brittle pricklypear dispels the myth that cacti are only for warm climates. The cultivar 'Freiburg' forms dense compact clumps of small, chubby, oval to cylindrical pads. In late spring and early summer it bears lemon-yellow flowers that fade to purple-red.

Brittle pricklypear is a low, mat-forming species bearing small, cylindrical or flattened, spiny pads that are specially adapted to survive beneath snow or...

Image of Opuntia humifusa photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Devil's Tongue, Eastern Pricklypear)

Most cacti perish in moist summers and cold winters, but this low-growing prickly pear manages to take it all in stride. Native to most of the United States east of the Rockies, it owes its remarkable cold hardiness to its ability to shed internal moisture prior to freezing. The moderately spiny pads (which are not leaves but rather modified stem segments) virtually deflate in fall, becoming a shriveled shadow of their former selves. They bulk up again with the warmth and moisture of spring, soon...

Image of Opuntia macrocentra photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Purple Prickleypear)

Exceptional color and a smaller more adaptable size make this great little prickly pear a year-round feast for the eyes. The relatively small, pale green, purple-tipped pads (which resemble large succulent leaves but in fact are modified stems) turn a showy purple under stressful conditions such as cold and heat. In addition, they are formidably but beautifully armed with long black white-tipped spines. Adding to its beauty are its bright yellow, red-centered flowers, which are profusely borne in...

Image of Opuntia microdasys photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Angel's Wings, Bunny Ears Pricklypear)

With its downy pads and tufts of whiskery hair-like bristles, this shrubby pricklypear looks soft to the touch - but beware! Its bristles (known as glochids) become painfully embedded in the skin at the slightest contact. A native of desert areas of north-central Mexico, it typically grows on hills or ridges in sandy or loamy, alkaline soil. It has naturalized in parts of Arizona.

The golden yellow glochids occur in conspicuous, spirally arranged clusters on the flattened, circular or oval...

Image of Opuntia microdasys

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Angel's Wings)

With its downy pads and tufts of whiskery hair-like bristles, this contorted form of bunny ears pricklypear looks soft to the touch - but beware! Its bristles (known as glochids) become painfully embedded in the skin at the slightest contact. Opuntia microdasys is native to desert areas of north-central Mexico, where it typically grows on hills or ridges in sandy or loamy, alkaline soil.

The golden yellow glochids occur in conspicuous, spirally arranged clusters on the circular or...

Image of Opuntia microdasys var. albospina photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Angel's Wings, Bunny Ears Pricklypear)

A lack of long conspicuous spines make this smaller prickly pear look soft and safe, but it wields many tiny hairlike bristles called glochids that are ferociously painful to the touch.

Bunny ears pricklypear is native to hills and ridges in the Chihuahua Desert of north-central Mexico. There, it typically grows in sandy or loamy, alkaline soil. This cactus has pads of soft green dotted with puffy clusters of white glochids. Although superficially resembling leaves (and treated as such in the...

Image of Opuntia phaeacantha photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Tulip Pricklypear)

This low-growing, spreading, relatively cold- and moisture-tolerant pricklypear cactus is native from Mexico to the Southwest and south-central United States. It may have been introduced to parts of this range by Native Americans who valued its fruit for both medicine and paint. This may also explain the dramatic diversity within this species, with 15 or more varieties described.

This cactus forms dense clumps of large pads (which are not leaves but rather modified stem segments) dotted with...