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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 38 of 52.

Image of Opuntia polyacantha photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Plains Pricklypear)

Spiny is the best word to describe the look of this low growing pricklypear cactus. It is native to central and western North America from Mexico to British Columbia. Plants from different regions often vary widely in characteristics such as spine length.

This cactus blooms in late spring or early summer with flower color often varying between locations. Generally speaking the blooms are yellow to red with many variations in between. Relatively unattractive brown, dry-fleshed fruits follow....

(Grizzlybear Pricklypear)

Spiny is the best word to describe the look of this low-growing pricklypear. This Southwest United States native is named and best known for its "grizzly bear" forms, which have long, white, often curling spines that sometimes resemble hairs. Other forms have shorter stiffer spines, often in darker hues such as brown or gray.

This cactus blooms in late spring or early summer with flower color often varying between forms. Generally speaking the blooms are yellow to red with many variations in between....

Image of Opuntia santa-rita photo by: Audrey, Eve and George DeLange

Audrey, Eve and George DeLange

(Santa Rita Pricklypear)

Beautiful purple and burgundy tinged blue-green, paddle-shaped stem segments and vivid canary yellow flowers make this among the most colorful pricklypear species. It is native to southern Arizona and Sonora, Mexico. The spiny pancake sized stem segments are highly variable, growing more purple in direct sun, but may lose color entirely in too much shade. This large pricklypear eventually forms an upright, head-high, tree-like shrub with a short trunk.

In spring the uppermost pads put forth...

Image of Opuntia santa-rita

John Rickard

(Santa Rita Pricklypear)

Beautiful, purple-and-burgundy tinged, blue-green, paddle-shaped stem segments and vivid canary yellow flowers make ‘Tubac’ among the most colorful of all prickly pears. The parent species is native to southern Arizona, New Mexico and Texas as well as Sonora, Mexico. Its spiny pancake-sized stem segments are highly variable, growing more purple in direct sun, but may lose color entirely in too much shade. This large pricklypear eventually forms an upright, head-high, tree-like shrub with a short...

Image of Orbea photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

This genus of carrion flowers contains just 20 species of tender, dwarf succulent plants. They are primarily native to the deserts of Africa, more specifically to East and South Africa, which includes widespread desert habitat. It prefers very fast draining raised rocky locations, which rarely retain much moisture but boulders offer protection from direct afternoon exposure.

All carrion flowers share the look and smell of a kill to draw flies, their primary pollinator. Smaller forms such as...

Image of Orbea variegata photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

This genus of carrion flowers contains just 20 species of tender, dwarf succulent plants. They are primarily native to the deserts of Africa, more specifically to East and South Africa, which includes widespread desert habitat. It prefers very fast draining raised rocky locations, which rarely retain much moisture but boulders offer protection from direct afternoon exposure.

All carrion flowers share the look and smell of a kill to draw flies, their primary pollinator. Smaller forms such as...

Image of Oreocereus photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Borzicactus)

This South American genus contains just six species of columnar cacti. They are mountain cacti native to the high Andes where they thrive in extremes of temperature and drought. They are specific to parts of this range in southern Peru, northern Chile, southern Bolivia, and northern Argentina.

The species are characterized as low shrubs with cylindrical stems covered in dense, white hairs. These provide protection from high UV light at altitude and insulation from cold. Branching is minimal...

Image of Oreocereus celsianus photo by: John Rickard

John Rickard

(Old-Man-of-the-Andes)

Old Man of the Andes is a striking cylindrical cactus due to its coat of dirty blond coarse hairs that covers its entire length. These hairs help protect and shade its green skin from both intense high altitude sunlight and the occasional cold snap. The species is native to Bolivia, Peru and northern Argentina where it is found on rocky cliffs at high elevations of the Andes and other mountain ranges. In cultivation it is rare to see more than a single stem, but in the wild these cacti will branch...

(Spiny Pennywort)

Grown for its ornamental rosettes of fleshy, bristle-tipped leaves, this low evergreen perennial from northeastern Asia resembles a spiny hen and chicks.

The symmetrical, dome-shaped rosettes of this rock-hardy perennial are crowded with numerous gray-green, oblong, succulent leaves, each ending in a white prickle. The rosettes are denser and more compact in winter, and looser and leafier in summer. Winter rosettes are sometimes "sunflower-shaped", comprising a tight central rosette and an outer...

Image of Pachycereus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Pachycereus)

The giant cacti in this genus are rivaled in size only by the giant saguaro. Pachycereus contains 12 species, which can be found throughout the southwestern states, but the majority are native to Mexico. They are renowned for the large forest populations found in Baja California. Much smaller populations exist in Honduras and Guatemala. It is named from the Greek word pachys, which translates to "thick" and refers to the massive thick stems of mature specimens. These cacti range...