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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 39 of 52.

Image of Pachycereus pecten-aboriginum photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Aborigine's Comb, Hairbrush Cactus)

The giant cacti in this genus are rivaled in size only by the giant saguaro. Pachycereus contains 12 species, which can be found throughout the southwestern states, but the majority are native to Mexico. They are renowned for the large forest populations found in Baja California. Much smaller populations exist in Honduras and Guatemala. It is named from the Greek word pachys, which translates to "thick" and refers to the massive thick stems of mature specimens. These cacti range...

Image of Pachycereus pringlei photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Cardon)

The giant cacti in this genus are rivaled in size only by the giant saguaro. Pachycereus contains 12 species, which can be found throughout the southwestern states, but the majority are native to Mexico. They are renowned for the large forest populations found in Baja California. Much smaller populations exist in Honduras and Guatemala. It is named from the Greek word pachys, which translates to "thick" and refers to the massive thick stems of mature specimens. These cacti range...

Image of Pachycereus schottii photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Old Man Cactus, Whisker Cactus)

This large, tall, multi-stemmed cactus forms large clumps and makes an outstanding specimen plant for desert gardens. United States populations are found almost exclusively at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in the southern reaches of Arizona. Some are also found in Baja and Sonora, Mexico. Wild populations favor dry, rocky hillsides and silty flats.

Young whisker cacti have single stems, but as they age they develop multiple growth points at the base that rise to form a candelabra of stems....

(Totem Pole Cactus)

This large, tall, multi-stemmed cactus forms large clumps and makes an outstanding specimen plant for desert gardens. United States populations are found almost exclusively at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in the southern reaches of Arizona. Some are also found in Baja and Sonora, Mexico. Wild populations favor dry, rocky hillsides and silty flats.

Young whisker cacti have single stems, but as they age they develop multiple growth points at the base that rise to form a candelabra of stems....

Image of Pachycereus weberi photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Candelabro)

The giant cacti in this genus are rivaled in size only by the giant saguaro. Pachycereus contains 12 species, which can be found throughout the southwestern states, but the majority are native to Mexico. They are renowned for the large forest populations found in Baja California. Much smaller populations exist in Honduras and Guatemala. It is named from the Greek word pachys, which translates to "thick" and refers to the massive thick stems of mature specimens. These cacti range...

Image of Pachypodium baronii photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Baron's Clubfoot, Red Pachypodium)

A branched, spiny-skinned succulent shrub, Baron's clubfoot is the only pachypodium species to produce red flowers. This semi-evergreen tropical plant is native to northern Madagascar, where it is increasingly endangered. The trunk of this succulent is bottle shaped, although a caudex is known to form on variety windsori.

Increasing drought in the tropical winter causes more foliage to drop away on the Baron's clubfoot. The tan-gray trunk is covered in pairs of conical spines. Once heat...

Image of Pachypodium geayi photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Madagascar-palm, Pachypodium)

A succulent small tree, looking like a combination of a cactus and a palm, this species of Madagascar-palm looks very similar to Pachypodium lamerei and P. rutenbergianum. Native to southern Madagascar, the misleadingly named Madagascar-palm is more closely related to oleanders (Nerium spp.) and desert roses (Adenium spp.) than true palms. This semi-evergreen succulent grows tall and slender with a plump, even obese trunk. Cool, dry winters cause the tufts of lustrous...

Image of Pachypodium horombense photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Horombe Clubfoot, Yellow Bell Pachypodium)

This succulent's plump, bottle-shaped base with numerous fat arms covered in spines seems to be taken from images in a Dr. Seuss book. The yellow bell pachypodium also bears yellow flowers on long stems during the warm months of the year. This semiarid succulent shrub or dwarf tree is native to the Horombe Plateau in south-central Madagascar. The trunk and branches are covered with short paired spines. A caudex also is present: a swollen trunk-root transitional area that stores water. Unless in flower,...

Image of Pachypodium lamerei photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Madagascar-palm, Pachypodium, Summer-blooming Clubfoot, Three-spined Clubfoot)

This succulent small tree looks like a combination of a cactus and a palm. The grouped spines on the gray trunk are interesting, but it's the white flowers with twisting petals that are the plant's ornamental forte. Native to southern Madagascar, the misleadingly named Madagascar-palm is more closely related to oleanders (Nerium spp.) and desert roses (Adenium spp.) than true palms. This semi-evergreen succulent grows tall and slender with a swollen trunk. Cool, dry winters cause...

Image of Pachypodium rosulatum photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Cactus Pachypodium, Elephant's Foot Plant, Yellow Rose Clubfoot)

A plump, bottle-shaped base with numerous fat arms covered in spines is indicative of any pachypodium. The cactus pachypodium also bears light yellow flowers on long stems during the warm months of the year. This semiarid succulent shrub or dwarf tree is native to the central plateaus of Madagascar. Several natural varieties exist, each native and adapted to specific environmental conditions across its native range. All are increasingly endangered in the wild. Cactus pachypodium's trunk and branches...