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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 4 of 52.

Image of Agave desmettiana

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Dwarf Century Plant, Smooth Century Plant, Variegated Smooth Century Plant)

Creamy yellow leaf edges set this plant apart from the solid-colored species. The parent species originates from eastern Mexico. Each symmetrical rosette has flexible, narrow arching leaves. The central leaf color varies from yellow green to blue green, depending on exposure and climate, and tends to be darker in full sun. At an early age the parent rosette develops densely packed offsets at the base. These may be severed, repotted and shared with friends.

The rosettes bloom at about 10 years...

Image of Agave ensifera photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Agave, Century Plant)

The genus Agave has more than 200 species of desert-loving perennials with dramatic, structurally interesting foliage. They are all from the warmer regions of the New World, mostly Mexico and Central and South America. They are beautiful ornamentals and important plants for food and utility.

Agave have fleshly leaves that form rosettes close to the ground or occasionally atop very short stout stems. The leaves may be thick and leathery, linear or sword-shaped, wide or narrow...

Image of Agave filifera photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Agave, Threadleaf Agave)

The genus Agave has more than 200 species of desert-loving perennials with dramatic, structurally interesting foliage. They are all from the warmer regions of the New World, mostly Mexico and Central and South America. They are beautiful ornamentals and important plants for food and utility.

Agave have fleshly leaves that form rosettes close to the ground or occasionally atop very short stout stems. The leaves may be thick and leathery, linear or sword-shaped, wide or narrow...

Image of Agave geminiflora photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Twin Flower Agave, Twin Flower Century Plant)

A dramatic plant which forms large bristling pincushions of narrow, fine-textured foliage, this Mexican native is a natural for the desert garden or the modern architectural landscape. The symmetrical, nearly stemless rosette comprises up to two hundred slender, bayonet-like leaves, each armed with a needle-sharp tip. This makes for notoriously difficult and often painful transplanting. Plants produce tall dark bronze flower spikes studded with boldly contrasting greenish-yellow flowers. The top...

Image of Agave guiengola photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Dolphin Agave, Dolphin Century Plant)

The genus Agave has more than 200 species of desert-loving perennials with dramatic, structurally interesting foliage. They are all from the warmer regions of the New World, mostly Mexico and Central and South America. They are beautiful ornamentals and important plants for food and utility.

Agave have fleshly leaves that form rosettes close to the ground or occasionally atop very short stout stems. The leaves may be thick and leathery, linear or sword-shaped, wide or narrow...

Image of Agave gypsophila photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Blue Wave Agave, Century Plant)

The rippled, arching, shark-toothed leaves of this Mexican native set it apart from other agaves. Native to gypsum-rich hillside soils in Jalisco, Michoacan, and Guerrero, it is well suited for gardens with well-drained alkaline soil. The deeply serrated, upcurled edges of the fleshy, blue-green, evergreen leaves give the appearance of being cut by pinking shears. Occurring in single rosettes that make few offsets, the long narrow wavy-edged leaves curve down at their tips. Rarely produced, the flowers...

(Harvard Agave, Harvard's Century Plant)

The dense blue-green rosettes of Harvard's century plant are dramatic and structurally interesting in the landscape. This all-American native naturally exists in the David Mountains located in western Texas. It is an unusually hardy species that can withstand periods of freezing as long as growing conditions remain dry, particularly at the root zone.

The blue-green fleshy leaves of this century plant are large, cupped and heavily spined along the margins. The sharp black leaf tips are particularly...

Image of Agave lechuguilla photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Lechuguilla, Shin Dagger)

Native all the way to central Canada (as well as to much of the rest of central and western North America), this prickly pear dispels the myth that cacti are only for warm climates. It is a ground-hugging, mat-forming species bearing small, cylindrical or flattened, spiny pads that are specially adapted to survive beneath snow or dead prairie grass. Although they appear to be succulent leaves, the pads are in fact swollen stem segments (but are treated as leaves in the following description of characteristics)....

Image of Agave macroculmis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Century Plant, Large-bracted Agave)

This large agave from high altitudes in central Mexico is prized not only for its striking appearance but also for its cold hardiness and shade tolerance. The long, broad-based, almost triangular leaves have jagged edges armed with conspicuous teeth. Leaf color varies from dark to light green. After many years, the leaf rosette sends forth a towering stem that bears dense clusters of up-facing funnel-shaped yellow blooms on long horizontal side stalks.

This uncommon agave does best in partial...

Image of Agave murpheyi photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Murphey's Agave, Murphey's Century Plant)

Perfect symmetry, large size and beautiful blue coloring make this succulent evergreen a focal point in any garden. Native to Arizona and Mexico, it is found only near ancient agricultural and settlement sites, where it was grown for fiber and food. Though resembling the common Agave americana, it rarely produces offsets, remaining as a single rosette and thus retaining its striking individual form. Mature rosettes (at least 6 years old) eventually produce a towering flower stalk with clusters...