Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 45 of 52.

(Night-blooming Cereus, Queen of the Night)

Looking up into a tropical tree, you'd overlook the queen of the night unless it was in bloom or its hose-like stems slapped you in the face. This evergreen perennial succulent is native to Mexico, northern Central America and the West Indies. It is an epiphyte, growing on other plants, such as attached to and flopping down from tree limbs.

In order to conserve moisture, the queen of the night lacks leaves. Instead, the long, ribbed stems are deep green and photosynthesize light. The stem is...

Image of Selenicereus hamatus photo by: Mary Crowell, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

Mary Crowell, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

(Queen of the Night)

The leathery, bumpy stems of the queen of the night look like what a young dragon's tail should look resemble. This evergreen perennial succulent is native to the Veracruz region of Mexico. It is an epiphyte, growing on other plants, such as attached to and flopping down from tree limbs or crotches.

In order to conserve moisture, the queen of the night lacks leaves. Instead, the long, ribbed stems are bright light green and photosynthesize light. The stem is leathery and about as thick as an...

(Princess of the Night, Snake Cactus)

When it comes to flower size and splendor, the princess of the night is arguably the visual queen. This evergreen perennial succulent is native to Mexico's tropical forests. It is an epiphyte, growing on other plants, such as attached to and flopping down from tree limbs.

In order to conserve moisture, the queen of the night lacks leaves. Instead, the snake-like, four- to six-angled stems are green but edged in purple. The stem is leathery and about 2-inches (5 cm) thick. Areoles - the bumps...

Image of Selenicereus spinulosus photo by: Carlos Velazco, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

Carlos Velazco, Wikimedia Commons Contributor

(Night-blooming Cereus, Vine-like Moonlight Cactus)

The approximately two dozen species in the genus Selenicereus are more commonly called moonlight cacti. These perennial, evergreen succulent plants have a floppy or clambering growth habit, often as epiphytes (growing on another plant such as a tree) or lithophytes (growing on rocks). Moonlight cactus species are native the southernmost United States and the West Indies into northern South America.

In order to conserve moisture, moonlight cacti lack leaves. Instead, plants have flattened...

(Moonlight Cactus)

The approximately two dozen species in the genus Selenicereus are more commonly called moonlight cacti. These perennial, evergreen succulent plants have a floppy or clambering growth habit, often as epiphytes (growing on another plant such as a tree) or lithophytes (growing on rocks). Moonlight cactus species are native the southernmost United States and the West Indies into northern South America.

In order to conserve moisture, moonlight cacti lack leaves. Instead, plants have flattened...

Image of Sempervivum photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Hens and Chicks)

This genus of exquisite small succulents contains about 40 species. These resilient, cold-hardy plants exist across the rocky and mountainous regions of Europe and Asia. They naturally inhabit the fissures and crevices of rocky outcrops where their fine roots become firmly anchored and easily obtain available water.

Sempervivum species form fleshy rosettes composed of thick, pointed leaves. The surfaces may be covered with short or long hairs, some are even thread-like. The leaves...

Image of Sempervivum

Jesse Saylor

(Hens and Chicks)

This genus of exquisite small succulents contains about 40 species. These resilient, cold-hardy plants exist across the rocky and mountainous regions of Europe and Asia. They naturally inhabit the fissures and crevices of rocky outcrops where their fine roots become firmly anchored and easily obtain available water.

Sempervivum species form fleshy rosettes composed of thick, pointed leaves. The surfaces may be covered with short or long hairs, some are even thread-like. The leaves...

Image of Sempervivum

Jesse Saylor

(Hens and Chicks)

This genus of exquisite small succulents contains about 40 species. These resilient, cold-hardy plants exist across the rocky and mountainous regions of Europe and Asia. They naturally inhabit the fissures and crevices of rocky outcrops where their fine roots become firmly anchored and easily obtain available water.

Sempervivum species form fleshy rosettes composed of thick, pointed leaves. The surfaces may be covered with short or long hairs, some are even thread-like. The leaves...

(Hens and Chicks)

Hens and chicks are tough, pretty and perfect for those interested in sustainable gardening. These succulents consist of ground-hugging spiraled rosettes that divide, creating colonies over time. The mother plant almost looks like a hen surrounded by her chicks, hence the common name. The pretty but uncommon cultivar ‘Black Velvet’ has a strong visual presence. Its slightly hairy fleshy leaves are deep maroon with green tips.

In late spring to early summer older rosettes may send up a single...

Image of Sempervivum

Jessie Keith

(Brownii Hens and Chicks, Hens and Chicks)

With its beautiful evergreen rosettes of succulent olive green, rose-tinged leaves accented by striking dark maroon-brown tips, this is one of many outstanding hybrid sempervivums. All derive from alpine species native to the mountains of southern Europe and western Asia. Their rosettes develop by offsets into crowded, colorful, richly textured mats. In summer the older rosettes of 'Brownii' send out thick stalks bristling with stubby pointed leaves and topped with dense clusters of tightly packed...