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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 49 of 52.

Image of Sempervivum montanum ssp. stiriacum photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

This evergreen succulent from the eastern Alps is grown for its small, symmetrical, mat-forming leaf rosettes and for its showy summer flowers. Also known as 'Braunii', it is distinguished from Sempervivum montanum var. montanum by its slightly narrower, brown-tipped leaves.

This hardy perennial produces tight, rounded rosettes of tiny, fleshy, dull green leaves with pointed, maroon-brown tips. The rosettes multiply via short-stalked offsets to form dense mats. In summer, some...

Image of Sempervivum tectorum photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Common Houseleek, Hens and Chicks)

This old-fashioned garden perennial is hardy, succulent and evergreen. Commonly called the houseleek, Sempervivum tectorum is so drought tolerant it will grow on old thatched roofs and even well worn tile roofs with a bit of organic matter. This European alpine has been in cultivation for well over a thousand years. In fact, the Frankish king, Charlemagne, listed it as an essential garden plant for protecting homes from fire in his 9th Century treatise on useful plants, the Capitulare...

Image of Sempervivum tectorum

Jessie Keith

(Common Houseleek)

With its symmetrical heads of fleshy, lime-green, maroon-tipped leaves, 'Sunset' is a garden jewel. It is one of many outstanding cultivars of the European alpine species Sempervivum tectorum. The evergreen rosettes develop by short-stalked offsets into crowded, colorful, richly textured mats. The leaves often turn deep burgundy and bronze in cold weather, providing bold contrast with frost and snow. In summer the older rosettes send out thick erect stems bristling with scaly leaves and...

Image of Senecio ficoides photo by: Altman Plants

Altman Plants

(Blue Chalksticks)

When coastal gardeners need fine textures and blue color in their gardens, no other plant beats blue sticks for looks and ease of cultivation. This plant is native to the Cape region of South Africa where the dry season is long and hot but tempered by the marine influence. This is why blue sticks does not perform well in very dry inland regions. This plant is a short creeper that sends out traveling stems topped with upstanding pencil thin leaves bearing pointed tips. They root as they travel,...

Image of Senecio serpens photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Miniature Blue Chalksticks)

Smaller and tougher, this fine texture blue succulent groundcover is ideal color for coastal frost free gardens. This plant is native to the Cape region of South Africa where the dry season is long and hot but tempered by the marine influence. It is a shorter alternative to the popular blue sticks or Senecio ficoides, offering a bit more heat resistance inland. This plant is a short creeper that sends out traveling stems topped with upstanding blunt tipped leaves. They are sky blue but take...

(Himalaya Kleinia, Kleinia)

This beautiful, spreading, succulent shrub offers a mass of blue color and fine textured foliage. The parent species is native to the Cape region of South Africa where the dry season is long and hot but tempered by the moist, marine influence. This is why these plants are indeed drought tolerant but are not as vigorous in very dry, inland regions. Unlike the more ground-hugging form, blue sticks, this selection, ‘Himalaya,’ produces larger woody stems that spread, but are not as inclined to root...

Image of Stapelia photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Stapelia)

This well known genus of enormous carrion flowers contains 45 species of tender, dwarf succulent plants. They are primarily native to South Africa from the cape region deep into the arid deserts of the eastern regions. It prefer very fast draining sandy soils or raised rocky locations, which rarely retain much moisture but boulders offer protection from direct afternoon exposure.

All carrion flowers share the look and smell of a kill to draw flies, their primary pollinator. The immense starfish...

Image of Stapelia gigantea photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Zulu Flower)

This well known genus of enormous carrion flowers contains 45 species of tender, dwarf succulent plants. They are primarily native to South Africa from the cape region deep into the arid deserts of the eastern regions. It prefer very fast draining sandy soils or raised rocky locations, which rarely retain much moisture but boulders offer protection from direct afternoon exposure.

All carrion flowers share the look and smell of a kill to draw flies, their primary pollinator. The immense starfish...

Image of Stapelia hirsuta photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Carrion Flower)

This well known genus of enormous carrion flowers contains 45 species of tender, dwarf succulent plants. They are primarily native to South Africa from the cape region deep into the arid deserts of the eastern regions. It prefer very fast draining sandy soils or raised rocky locations, which rarely retain much moisture but boulders offer protection from direct afternoon exposure.

All carrion flowers share the look and smell of a kill to draw flies, their primary pollinator. The immense starfish...

Image of Stenocereus photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Stenocereus)

This group of widely ranging cacti includes about 25 species. They are native to Arizona, Mexico, Central America, Columbia, Venezuela and the West Indies. The genus name is derived from the Greek word stenos, which means narrow and refers to the narrow width of the ribs along the stems.

Stenocereus is primarily columnar in form, but some have creeping stems and others are slightly shrubby and even tree-like. Each stout, cylindrical green stem has numerous ribs. Species...