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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 51 of 52.

Image of Tephrocactus articulatus var. diadematus photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Spruce Cone Cactus)

This curious Argentine cactus has fragile erect stems composed of cylindrical segments that resemble pine cones. Prominent tubercules and clusters of silvery spines are spirally arranged along the segments. Some forms lack spines. The stems fragment readily if jostled or bumped. A shy bloomer, this cactus sometimes produces white to pinkish, cup-shaped flowers in spring or early summer. The fruits that follow are barrel shaped, dry-fleshed, and very thin walled.

This plant prospers in full sun...

Image of Trichocereus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Trichocereus )

This diverse family of succulents is comprised of approximately 90 genera and thousands of species. All are native throughout the New World from North to South America and throughout the West Indies. They are characterized by beautiful densely petaled flowers with whorls of stamens that come in an array of bright colors, such as yellow, red, pink, magenta, white and orange. These attract a wide variety of pollinators, depending on the species, such as birds, bats, moths and bees. Many plants are...

(Trichocereus )

This diverse family of succulents is comprised of approximately 90 genera and thousands of species. All are native throughout the New World from North to South America and throughout the West Indies. They are characterized by beautiful densely petaled flowers with whorls of stamens that come in an array of bright colors, such as yellow, red, pink, magenta, white and orange. These attract a wide variety of pollinators, depending on the species, such as birds, bats, moths and bees. Many plants are...

Image of Trichocereus spachianus photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Golden Torch)

This diverse family of succulents is comprised of approximately 90 genera and thousands of species. All are native throughout the New World from North to South America and throughout the West Indies. They are characterized by beautiful densely petaled flowers with whorls of stamens that come in an array of bright colors, such as yellow, red, pink, magenta, white and orange. These attract a wide variety of pollinators, depending on the species, such as birds, bats, moths and bees. Many plants are...

Image of Welwitschia mirabilis photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Tree Tumbo, Tumboa)

Best described as peculiar or unbelievable, tumboa grows two large and wide leaves that flop and twist like a ribbon, and produces small cones rather than flowering. An extremely slow growing xeric plant (but not a true succulent) that is related to cycads and conifer evergreens, it is native to the harsh deserts with nighttime fogs of Namibia and Angola in southern Africa. This plant on average lives between 450 and 1000 years and its foliage is sometimes chewed upon by antelope and rhinoceroses.

The...

Image of X Graptosedum photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Sedum)

This group of tender succulents are the result of an unusual cross between two Mexican genera, while most hybrids are a cross between two species. One parent is the ghost plant, Graptopetalum paraguayensis, which features a rosette of leaves in a mother of pearl like coloration. The other is hardier Sedum stahlii, known as coral beads which resembles a round pearl leaf form of donkey tail. The various hybrids represent different individual characteristics of both parents. They make...

Image of X Graptosedum

Altman Plants

(Sedum, Vera Higgins Sedum)

This plant is the result of an unusual cross between two Mexican genera, while most hybrids are a cross between two species. One parent is the ghost plant, Graptopetalum paraguayensis, which features a rosette of leaves in a mother of pearl like coloration. The other is hardier Sedum stahlii, known as coral beads which resembles a round pearl leaf form of donkey tail. This hybrid features the rosette form and the ghostly color of one parent on the new growth and the purple-red or...

Image of Yucca aloifolia f. marginata photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Aloe Yucca, Variegated Aloe Yucca)

This beautiful white yucca is favored in southern gardens where it is often found in pedestal urns around old homes. Aloe yucca is native to southeastern America, from the Carolinas to Louisiana, and can also be found on some Caribbean Islands. It tends to grow along dunes and ancient shell mounds with little fertility. Surprisingly, it is not well-adapted to the dry, inland deserts of the western United States.

Aloe yucca has flexible, linear blades that rise from a dense, tight rosette. Each...

Image of Yucca brevifolia photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

(Joshua Tree)

This is likely one of the best known yuccas due to the popularity of Joshua Tree National Park in Twentynine Palms, California. Yucca brevifolia is a succulent, evergreen that reaches great heights with a candelabra of branches topped with rosettes of spiky leaves. A Mojave Desert endemic, it exists in sagebrush, pinyon-juniper and desert grassland ecosystems where it survives the harshest growing conditions. This is a very slow-growing, very long-lived yucca. Mature specimens reach huge,...

Image of Yucca gloriosa

James H. Schutte

(Moundlily Yucca, Spotted Tiger Moundlily Yucca)

Tall stalks topped with dense clusters of gray-green sword-like leaves lend this tree-like yucca tropical looks.

Moundlily yucca is a common site in gardens where summers are either hot and humid or hot and dry. It inhabits the sandy coastal soils of the southeast from Louisiana to Florida and north to South Carolina, so it’s adapted to both dry soils and locations with high heat. Very large specimens can be seen in old neighborhoods in the far south, as well as those in California, because it...