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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 8 of 52.

Image of Aloe arborescens photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Candelabra Aloe, Tree Aloe)

While it takes many years for this branched, tree-like evergreen to reach full size, it’s absolutely fabulous in the meantime. Eventually growing to well above head height, this native of southern Africa bears rosettes of long, succulent, dagger-shaped leaves a candelabra of stems. The grayish green leaves have saw-toothed edges. In winter or early spring, long stalks topped with conical clusters of red tubular flowers arise from the leaf rosettes. Some plants have yellow blooms. Adapted for pollination...

Image of Aloe aristata photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Lace Aloe, Torch Plant)

A cute, cold-hardy, ground-hugging aloe from eastern South Africa and Lesotho, this little charmer is an excellent choice for container gardens indoors and out thanks to its tidy form and vivid flowers. Succulent, lance-shaped, evergreen leaves dotted with white warty protuberances and tipped with white tail-like bristles are densely packed into round, perfectly symmetrical rosettes that offset to form clumps. Loose conical clusters of tubular red flowers are borne atop calf-high stems in summer....

Image of Aloe barberae photo by: Mark A. Miller

Mark A. Miller

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe brevifolia photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Short-leaved Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe bussei photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe cameronii photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Cameron's Ruwari Aloe, Red Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe camperi photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe capitata photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Head Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe ciliaris photo by: John Rickard

John Rickard

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe cryptopoda photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...