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Plants Matching cactus or succulent

Returned 515 results. Page 9 of 52.

Image of Aloe deltoideodonta photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe dichotoma photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Kokerboom, Quiver Tree)

This succulent tree aloe becomes a living work of art as it matures. It is suited to frost free gardens in regions with dry summers, such as southern California, and originates from South Africa in open country that lacks true trees. Wild plants can form colonies and attract weaverbirds that hang their pendulous nests from the branches.

The trunk-like stem of this aloe is smooth, lightly striated and tan. Branches form towards the top and support clusters of foliage. The fleshy, lance-shaped,...

Image of Aloe distans photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Jewelled Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe ferox photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Cape Aloe)

The largest and most ferocious looking of all aloes, cape aloe is incredibly elegant in the garden. This grand species from South Africa is variable, with plants in the wild showing a marked change in thorn density. This frost tender rosette of large, fleshy blue-green leaves bears thorns not only at leaf edges but generously studding smooth surfaces as well. Leaves do take on a pink and red coloring during the winter. Cape aloe blooms in spring bearing a large, heavily branched spike tipped with...

Image of Aloe harlana photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe humilis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe maculata photo by: Russell Stafford

Russell Stafford

(Soap Aloe)

A small, stemless, suckering aloe from drylands of southern Africa, this succulent evergreen is valued for its ornamental leaves, compact dense habit, and showy flowers. Broadly lance shaped, light- to dark-green leaves with oblong white speckles and brown-toothed margins are borne in ground-hugging rosettes that spread to form large dense clumps. In late spring and summer they give rise to dense heads of drooping tubular flower on branched knee-high stems. Adapted for pollination by sunbirds, the...

Image of Aloe marlothii photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe ngobitensis photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...

Image of Aloe nyeriensis photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Aloe)

The genus Aloe contains around 300 species of succulent plants grown for both their exquisite flowers and fleshy foliage. They are primarily native to southern Africa and the island of Madagascar but also exist in the Cape Verde Islands and the Arabian Peninsula. All of these regions are arid tropical zones, so aloes are adapted to dry, frost-free areas.

These plants typically develop a rosette of linear, triangular or sword shaped leaves with short, sharp thorns along the leaf edges...