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Plants Matching dried flower/everlasting

Returned 431 results. Page 8 of 44.

(Chinese Astilbe, Chinese False Spirea, Heart and Soul Chinese Astilbe)

The vigorous patented Astilbe ‘Heart and Soul’ has a uniform compact habit and neat upright plumes of pale lavender-pink flowers. The fabulous feathery pyramidal blooms have a distinctive blue-caste making them bluest of all astilbes. They appear in late spring to summer above compact mounds of dark green, ferny, compound leaves.

Chinese in origin, this hardy perennial is surprisingly heat and sun-tolerant and noted for its adaptability. Still, it grows best when provided partial sun...

Image of Astrantia

Terra Nova Nurseries, Inc.

(Hadspen Blood Masterwort, Masterwort)

Masterwort 'Hadspen Blood' is a clump-forming perennial that has palmately lobed leaves and airy, dark red, small flowers held on thin dark red stems. It blooms in late spring throughout late summer and slowly darkens to a maroon.

Masterwort requires well-drained, consistently moist soil in full or partial sun.

(Great Masterwort, Lars Masterwort)

Lars masterwort is a clump-forming perennial that has palmately lobed leaves and airy rosy pink, small flowers held on thin stems. The flowers darken in time to a burgundy or maroon. 'Lars' blooms in late spring throughout late summer and has a faint honey fragrance.

Masterwort requires well-drained, consistently moist soil in full or partial sun. The umbel and bracts consist of a dusky pinkish-red tint.

Image of Astrantia major

Terra Nova Nurseries, Inc.

(Great Masterwort, Magnum Blush Masterwort)

Masterwort ‘Magnum Blush’ is an herbaceous, clump-forming perennial grown for larger, more numerous flowers. Masterworts are native to the alpine forest and meadows of Central and Eastern Europe. They have palmately lobed lower leaves with simple, stalk-less leaves on the stems. Masterwort blooms are unusual; they are produced on stalks above the foliage in dense, flat clusters surrounded by papery bracts (modified leaves) spring throughout mid-summer. The flowers are desirable for cutting and...

Image of Baptisia

James Burghardt

(Carolina Moonlight False Indigo, Hybrid False Indigo)

Beautifully clumping with upright stems clothed in bluish green leaves, Carolina Moonlight false indigo has pretty spikes of light yellow flowers in mid-spring to early summer. A hybrid herbaceous perennial, it resulted from the cross of Baptisia alba with B. sphaerocarpa. It is slow growing with a deep taproot.

The blue-green to light green leaves have three oval leaflets. Depending on severity of the winter, the emergent stems and leaves will produce an upright flower spike...

Image of Baptisia

Jessie Keith

(Hybrid False Indigo)

Beautifully clumping with upright stems clothed in bluish green leaves, Chocolate Chip false indigo has pretty spikes of brown-burgundy flowers in mid-spring to early summer. A hybrid herbaceous perennial, it resulted from the cross of Baptisia alba with B. sphaerocarpa. It is slow growing with a deep taproot.

The blue-green to light green leaves have three oval leaflets. Depending on severity of the winter, the emergent stems and leaves will produce an upright flower spike...

Image of Baptisia alba photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(White False Indigo)

Beautifully clumping with upright purple-gray stems clothed in bluish green leaves, white false indigo has pretty spikes of white, lupine-like flowers in mid-spring to early summer. An herbaceous perennial from the dry woods in the southeastern United States, it is slow growing with a deep taproot.

The blue-green to light green leaves have three oval leaflets. Depending on severity of the winter, the emergent stems and leaves will produce an upright flower spike as early as mid-spring, or later...

Image of Baptisia arachnifera photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Cobwebby Wild Indigo, Hairy Rattleweed)

Gray-green leaves that look like those of a species of Eucalyptus is one reason cobwebby wild indigo is delightful; the others are its yellow flowers and dark seeds. An herbaceous perennial endemic (native only) to Georgia in the southeastern United States, it is a locally (state) and federally endangered wildflower species.

The light green, oval to heart-shaped leaves are covered in silvery gray, making it resemble the florist filler sprigs of an eucalpyt. In early summer, it produces...

Image of Baptisia australis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Blue False Indigo, Plains False Indigo)

When looking upon a mature false indigo in bloom it looks much like a small shrub, but it’s truly an herbaceous perennial, meaning it dies back to the ground each year. Native populations of false indigo exist across a large part of eastern North America, in all but a few of the most southern states. They tend to grow in old-fields, prairies and other open wild areas. Some Native American tribes used Baptisia roots for medicine and the flowers or flowering stems for the dye they yield. Despite...

Image of Baptisia australis var. minor photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Dwarf Blue False Indigo)

This is a shorter variety of the large, bushy perennial, false indigo, so it's better suited to smaller garden spaces. Native populations of false indigo exist across a large part of eastern North America, in all but a few of the most southern states. They tend to grow in old-fields, prairies and other open wild areas. Some Native American tribes used Baptisia roots for medicine and the flowers or flowering stems for the dye they yield. Despite the common name, false indigo dye is not blue...