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Plants Matching epiphyte

Returned 103 results. Page 2 of 11.

Image of Ascocentrum miniatum photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Orchid, Rust-red Ascocentrum)

A miniature orchid with an attractive fan of leaves, Ascocentrum miniatum is no less than stunning when its cluster of brilliant orange flowers appears in spring. And the spectacular flowers can last for months! An evergreen frost-tender orchid from Thailand, rust-red ascocentrum is an epiphyte that thrives in tropical climates. It is very similar in habit and flower to Ascocentrum garayi.

The small plant looks like a fan with fleshy, leathery roots that clasp to tree trunks...

Image of Billbergia photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Bromeliad)

There are approximately 50 species of these tropical, epiphytic (tree-dwelling) bromeliads. Native from southern Brazil to northern Mexico, they come in a wide variety of colors and are favorites of many tropical gardeners due to their grace and beauty. The genus was named to honor Swedish botanist, Gustav Billberg. Many species have been hybridized to create lots of new and interesting horticultural forms of Billbergia.

As a group, billbergias have long, slender rosettes with a few leaves...

Image of Billbergia nutans photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(Queen's Tears)

Queen's tears is a clump forming, epiphyte to semi-epiphyte with narrow, pendent, unusually colored flowers. The tubular blooms have reflexed green petals with narrow bands of purplish blue around their edges and are supported by showy reddish pink bracts. The plant resembles a fountain-shaped grass until the short red flower stalks and blooms appear. Native populations of this bromeliad exist from southern Brazil to Paraguay where they grow on both trees and the forest floor.

In warm climates,...

Image of Brassavola nodosa photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Lady of the Night, Orchid)

Beautiful in the daylight but only fragrant when the sun goes down, lady-of-the-night produces white blossoms in spring, often with a second bloom period in autumn. This tender epiphyte or lithophyte is native to Mexico and Central America extending down to Colombia and Venezuela. It naturally grows in the upper branches of mangroves and lowland trees as well as along cliff rocks.

The rich green leaves are stiff and narrow sometimes curling inward like long cylinders. They grow from slender pseudobulbs...

Image of Brassia arcuigera photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Arching Brassia, Arching Spider Orchid, Orchid)

Flowering in early autumn, arching spider orchid produces stems lined with angular, thin flowers of golden yellow marked with purple and sienna. The spidery flowers are also highly fragrant. This evergreen epiphyte is native to tropical highland forests from Costa Rica to Peru. Oddly enough, the spider-like flowers are pollinated by a spider-stinging wasp tricked to think each flower is a spider victim!

The flattened, oval, sheath-covered pseudobulbs of this orchid bear two spreading, strap-like...

Image of Brassia lawrenceana photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Lawrence's Brassia, Orchid)

Flowering in springtime on stems lined with angular, thin flowers of light yellow marked with violet, the Lawrence's brassia orchid is beautiful in faint fragrance and its slender geometric preciseness. A frost-tender evergreen orchid that is an epiphyte (grows on another plant), it is native to the highland forests across a northern band of South America from Peru to French Guiana across the Amazon Basin. Interestingly, the flowers are pollinated by a spider-stinging wasp that thinks the flower...

Image of Brassia signata photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Brassia, Marked Brassia, Marked Spider Orchid)

Flowering in spring and summer on short stems lined with angular, thin flowers of olive-yellow marked with maroon, the marked spider orchid is beautiful in fragrance and its geometric preciseness. A frost-tender evergreen orchid that is an epiphyte (grows on another plant), it is native to southern Mexico's mountain forests. Interestingly, the flowers are pollinated by a spider-stinging wasp that thinks the flower is a spider victim and is stung by the wasp, effectively pollinating the orchid!

The...

Image of Brassia verrucosa photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Orchid, Warty Brassia)

Flowering in summer lined with angular, thin flowers of light apple green marked with darker green and sienna spotted "warts", the warty spider orchid is peppery in fragrance and its slender geometric preciseness. A cold-tender evergreen orchid that is an epiphyte (grows on another plant), it is native to the montane forests from Mexico and Nicaragua to northwestern Brazil. Interestingly, the flowers are pollinated by a spider-stinging wasp that thinks the flower is a spider prey and is stung by...

Image of Bulbophyllum burfordiense photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Bulbophyllum, Orchid)

Despite the malodorous nature of the greenish brown cap-like flowers of Burford's bulbophyllum, this fall-blooming orchid is a reliable performer and conversation piece. A tropical epiphyte from the hot and humid forests of New Guinea and eastern Indonesia, it dots upper tree branches and produces slightly stinky flowers that attract flies as pollinators.

The slender, bright green leaves of this orchid are thick and leathery. The plants are comprised of many pseudobulbs, each carrying only one...

Image of Bulbophyllum spiesii photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Bulbophyllum, Orchid)

Large, flopping, tongue-like leaves and clusters of dark red flowers that reek of rotting meat, make Bulbophyllum spiesii an orchid that should be encountered at least once! (But maybe not twice.) A tropical epiphyte from the hot, humid forests of New Guinea eastward into the nearby Pacific Islands, it thrives along low and mid-level tree branches and trunks. The rotten stench of the flowers attracts green bottle flies, which pollinate the blooms.

Plants are comprised of a small group...