Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching fern

Returned 122 results. Page 10 of 13.

Image of Nephrolepis exaltata photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Boston Swordfern)

A common, old-fashioned plant for containers and hanging baskets, Boston swordfern is easy to grow and tolerant of summer warmth and humidity. This large, evergreen to semi-evergreen fern originates from regions in Mexico, Central America and South America as well as sub-Saharan Africa and Polynesia. It has dense, arching, lance-shaped fronds of medium green and develops a bushy to weeping habit. Plants slowly spread by rhizomes and require regular division—particularly if container grown.

Like...

Image of Nephrolepis exaltata

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Boston Fern, Boston Swordfern)

A common, old-fashioned plant for containers and hanging baskets, Boston fern is easy to grow and tolerant or summer warmth and humidity.

This large, evergreen to semi-evergreen fern originates from regions in Mexico, Central and South America. The cultivar ‘Bostoniensis’ has dense, arching, lance-shaped fronds of medium green that are broader than the standard species. When mature it develops a distinct mop-like weeping habit.

Like most ferns, Boston fern grows best in full to partial shade...

(Boston Swordfern, Dallas Jewel Boston Fern)

A new selection of an old favorite, ‘Dallas Jewel’ is a compact, vigorous Boston swordfern with spreading and arching, shiny fronds. Like all Boston ferns, it is easy to grow and tolerant or summer warmth and humidity. The parent species is an evergreen to semi-evergreen fern native to the tropical Americas, Africa and Polynesia. The fronds of ‘Dallas Jewel’ are medium green and shorter than those of the parent species, making the habit more compact. This fern spreads by rhizomes (underground stems)...

Image of Nephrolepis exaltata

James H. Schutte

(Boston Swordfern)

A sterile selection of the classic Boston swordfern, ‘Fluffy Ruffles’ is a compact, elegant fern with spreading and arching, shiny fronds lined with wavy-edged and incised leaflets. Easy to grow and tolerant or summer warmth and humidity, its parent species is an evergreen to semi-evergreen fern native to the tropical Americas, Africa and Polynesia. The fronds of ‘Fluffy Ruffles' are medium green to slightly yellowed, shorter and more arching than those of the parent species, all helping to make...

Image of Nephrolepis obliterata photo by: Grandiflora

Grandiflora

(Swordfern)

Australian sword fern is a large, ground-dwelling or terrestrial fern which grows in rainforests upon rocks or in soil near lakes or streams native to northeastern Australia and New Guinea. It spreads slowly by rhizomes (below ground stems) and stolons (above ground lateral stems). The leaf stems or petioles are covered with sparse red-brown hair-like scales with pale margins and a few longer hairs. The fronds are evergreen, long and feather like, the leaflets have margins which are lightly scalloped....

Image of Nephrolepis obliterata

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Kimberley Queen Sword Fern, Swordfern)

The Kimberley Queen sword fern is among the easiest of ferns to grow. This fern's long fronds with a lovely medium green to dark green color are held upright and gently arch to form a handsome rounded clump. It is considered a tidier looking plant when compared to the species. In its native northeastern Australia and New Guinea, it would be found growing in rainforests upon rocks or in soil near lakes or streams.

'Kimberley Queen' needs very bright indirect light in a soil that is moist and fertile;...

Image of Osmunda photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Osmunda)

This genus covers 12 species of deciduous ferns that are found in wet locations worldwide, except Australasia. The fronds of these ferns share several features. They are upright or arching, lance-shaped to triangular in outline, and divided into pinnae (leaflets) which may in turn be divided. The regularity of the pinnae give these ferns a reserved elegance. The fronds emerge from large upright rhizomes (underground stems) to form tall, lax clumps and turn yellow or tan in autumn.The plants spread...

Image of Osmunda cinnamomea photo by: Mark Kane

Mark Kane

(Cinnamon Fern)

This imposing, clump forming, deciduous fern is native to North America, the West Indies, and eastern Asia. Its silver-haired fiddleheads emerge from thick rhizomes in mid-spring, unfurling to large triangular pinnate fronds. Hummingbirds visit the hairy stems to collect down for their nests. Leafless fertile fronds resembling fuzzy cinnamon sticks arise in late spring, collapsing in summer after shedding their spores.

Cinnamon fern thrives in damp humus-rich acidic soil in partial shade. Plant...

(Interrupted Fern)

A clump-forming herbaceous perennial with stately fronds "interrupted" by curious spore-bearing bodies that resemble shriveled bunches of grapes, this eastern North American and east Asian native is among the first ferns to appear in spring. Silky down from the emerging fiddleheads is collected by hummingbirds to furnish their nests. The fiddleheads unfurl to form a lush whorl of fresh green foliage, achieving imposing proportions in rich soil.

This impressive and interesting fern grows easily...

Image of Osmunda regalis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Regal Fern)

Regal, that is of outstanding merits, is but one way to describe the tremendously elegant fronds of the regal fern. A deciduous large fern that grows from an upright, massive rhizome that can become trunk-like, it is native to eastern North America, much of Europe and extreme northern Africa in moist swamps and bogs. The upright rhizome can branch with age and is covered in hairs and scars wrapped in black fibrous roots, called osmunda fiber.

Ranging from modestly sized to massive, the fronds...