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Plants Matching fern

Returned 122 results. Page 9 of 13.

Image of Dryopteris uniformis

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Crested Uniform Wood Fern)

uniform wood fern

(Dixie Wood Fern)

An architecturally interesting, upright fern with bright green foliage, the Dixie wood fern grows best in moist soils, but can tolerate drier ground. This semi-evergreen, clumping perennial is a naturally occuring hybrid between Dryopteris ludoviciana and Dryopteris celsa that is encountered in the southeastern United States. Not flowering or setting seed, the Dixie wood fern is sterile, rarely or never producing the spores on leaf undersides common to other ferns.

Grow Dixie...

Image of Dryopteris x complexa photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Hybrid Male Fern)

hybrid male fern

(Remote Wood Fern)

Remote wood fern is a rare and fertile natural hybrid of Dryopteris affinis and D. expansa. Found growing in the subalpine forests along streams in central Europe and western Asia, its semi-evergreen green fronds arise from an erect rhizome and have a golden brown center.

Like other ferns, it does well in a shady location with moist soil and protected from winds. A large sweeping mass of remote woody ferns would be magnificent under tall woodland trees, or incorporated among...

Image of Matteuccia struthiopteris photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Ostrich Fern)

Ostrich fern is a herbaceous plant native to northern woodlands and wetlands in Europe, East Asia, and North America. In spring its tightly curled "fiddleheads" unfurl to majestic sterile fronds clustered in vase-shaped clumps. It also produces fertile spore-bearing fronds that give the appearance of stunted, desiccated sterile fronds. They remain standing after the fertile fronds decline in fall. Plants spread vigorously by thick underground rhizomes.

To reach its impressive full size, ostrich...

Image of Microlepia strigosa photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Lace Fern)

Native to tropical Asia, this large evergreen fern spreads by underground rhizomes to form clumps of delicate lacy light green fronds. The leaflets ("pinnae") of the ovate to triangular fronds are themselves divided into pinnate segments.

This fern needs ample water during the growing season but likes to be a bit drier in winter. Use it as a specimen or groundcover in a partially shaded site such as a woodland edge or an east-facing foundation planting. It also works well as a potted specimen...

(Broad Swordfern)

Broad sword fern is a ground-dwelling or terrestrial fern, native to Florida, Mexico, the West Indies, Central and South America. It spreads slowly by rhizomes (below ground stems) and stolons (above ground lateral stems). The leaf stems or petioles are covered with sparse to moderate, one-color, reddish to light brown hair-like scales. The fronds are evergreen, long, once-pinnate or feather like, the leaflets have margins which are finely double-toothed and are densely pubescent below. The fronds...

Image of Nephrolepis biserrata

James Burghardt

(Broad Swordfern, Macho Broad Sword Fern)

Broad sword fern is a ground-dwelling or terrestrial fern, native to Florida, Mexico, the West Indies, Central and South America. It spreads slowly by rhizomes (below ground stems) and stolons (above ground lateral stems). The leaf stems or petioles are covered with sparse to moderate, one-color, reddish to light brown hair-like scales. The fronds are evergreen, long, once-pinnate or feather like, the leaflets have margins which are finely double-toothed and are densely pubescent below. Macho fern...

Image of Nephrolepis biserrata var. furcans photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Broad Swordfern)

Fish tail fern is a ground-dwelling or terrestrial fern, native to southeastern Asia. It spreads slowly by rhizomes (below ground stems) and stolons (above ground lateral stems). The leaf stems or petioles are covered with sparse to moderately numerous, one-color, reddish to light brown hair-like scales. The fronds are evergreen, long, once-pinnate, or feather like, and end in two or three forked division like the tail of a fish. This gives the fern a frilly look. The fronds are often arching or...

Image of Nephrolepis cordifolia photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Southern Swordfern)

This is one of the few ferns that thrives in warm climates, where it provides distinctive foliage for landscaping. It is native to the tropics around the world and has proven itself over time as an exceptionally vigorous tall ground cover. It resembles the more delicate Boston fern, forming a mound of arching and upright fronds. The lime-green leaves rise out of traveling underground stems that spread so quickly they border on invasive.

Its value lies in its elegant fronds that are long and narrow,...