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Plants Matching fruit

Returned 719 results. Page 10 of 72.

Image of Citrus x paradisi

James H. Schutte

(Grapefruit, Star Ruby Grapefruit)

Large, pendent clusters of sunny, yellow fruit, reminiscent of grapes, give grapefruit its common name. It is a natural hybrid of the Asian pummelo (Citrus maxima) and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) that was first described as the Barbados “Forbidden Fruit” by Griffith Hughes in 1750. The tree was later found on several islands of the West Indies, including Jamaica, and arrived in the United States around 1853 thanks to Odette Philippe.

Grapefruit trees are large, evergreen...

Image of Citrus x paradisi

James H. Schutte

(Grapefruit, Thompson Pink Grapefruit)

Large, pendent clusters of sunny, yellow fruit, reminiscent of grapes, give grapefruit its common name. It is a natural hybrid of the Asian pummelo (Citrus maxima) and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) that was first described as the Barbados “Forbidden Fruit” by Griffith Hughes in 1750. The tree was later found on several islands of the West Indies, including Jamaica, and arrived in the United States around 1853 thanks to Odette Philippe.

Grapefruit trees are large, evergreen...

Image of Citrus x tangelo photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Tangelo)

Surprisingly sweet and tart, easy to peel and eat, tangelos are favored by citrus gourmands and often planted in backyard orchards. These large evergreen trees are either a happy accident or purposeful cross between a grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi) and tangerine (Citrus x reticulata). The hybrids were first described in both California and Florida in the late 1890s.

Tangelo trees have upright, rounded crowns covered with large, glossy, linear, pointed leaves. Flowers appear...

Image of Citrus x tangelo

John Rickard

(Honeybell Tangelo, Tangelo)

Surprisingly sweet and tart, easy to peel and eat, tangelos are favored by citrus gourmands and often planted in backyard orchards. These large evergreen trees are either a happy accident or purposeful cross between a grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi) and tangerine (Citrus x reticulata). The hybrids were first described in both California and Florida in the late 1890s.

Tangelo trees have upright, rounded crowns covered with large, glossy, linear, pointed leaves. Flowers appear...

Image of Citrus x tangelo

James H. Schutte

(Orlando Tangelo, Tangelo)

Surprisingly sweet and tart, easy to peel and eat, tangelos are favored by citrus gourmands and often planted in backyard orchards. These large evergreen trees are either a happy accident or purposeful cross between a grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi) and tangerine (Citrus x reticulata). The hybrids were first described in both California and Florida in the late 1890s.

Tangelo trees have upright, rounded crowns covered with large, glossy, linear, pointed leaves. Flowers appear...

Image of Cucumis melo photo by: Scott Bauer, USDA/ARS

Scott Bauer, USDA/ARS

(Cantaloupe, Casaba Melon, Honey Dew, Melon, Muskmelon)

Garden fresh melons are truly a summertime treat. Fragrant and delicious, these warm season fruits have been bred and revered by cultures worldwide and come in all shapes, sizes and colors. Muskmelons, cantaloupes and "late melons," like honeydew and casaba, are all Cucumis melo variants believed to have origins in Africa.

Melons are tropical annual vines with long, spreading stems that cling via springy tendrils. Their big lobed leaves are coarse, fuzzy and medium to deep green. Bright...

Image of Cucumis melo

All-America Selections

(Canary Melon)

This 2004 All-America Selections Winner boasts lovely compact melons with beautiful golden yellow skin, small seed cavities and sweet ivory flesh. The prolific vines of this canary melon are resilient and produce lots of 2 to 3 pound fruits that are ready for harvest around 70 days after planting. They are also more compact than average, making them well-suited to smaller garden spaces.

Melons are tropical annual vines with long, spreading stems that cling via springy tendrils. Their big lobed...

Image of Cucumis melo

James H. Schutte

(Ananas d'Amerique A Chair Verte Melon, Melon)

The heirloom pineapple melon, 'Ananas d'Amerique A Chair Verte', translates to “pineapple of America with green flesh", so it has roots in both France and America. Its elongated oval fruits have greenish-tan netted skin and firm, ivory or pale green flesh that’s sweet, fragrant and somewhat like pineapple. The vines produce lots small to medium pound fruits that are ready for harvest around 75 to 80 days after planting. This cultivar may also be sold under the name “ananas.”

Melons are tropical...

Image of Cucumis melo

All-America Selections

(Cantaloupe)

Named for its heavenly flavor, ‘Angel’ is a vigorous melon that was recognized as a 2003 All-America Selections Winner. The 2 to 3 pound fruits have yellow and green netted skin, small seed cavities and fragrant, crisp, white flesh within. The fast-growing vines are relatively compact and produce melons only 60 days after planting.

Melons are tropical annual vines with long, spreading stems that cling via springy tendrils. Their big lobed leaves are coarse, fuzzy and medium to deep green. Bright...

Image of Cucumis melo

James Burghardt

(Athena Cantaloupe, Cantaloupe)

Highly disease resistant vines produce classic cantaloupes that are fragrant and delicious. ‘Athena’ is a vigorous hybrid that produces 5 to 6 pound fruits around 75 days after planting. It has orange and tan netted skin and sweet, juicy salmon-orange flesh within. The vines are very compact and can produce as many as seven melons. The crack-resistant fruits store well too. The netted skin reveals this is truly a muskmelon.

Melons are tropical annual vines with long, spreading stems that cling...