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Plants Matching fruit

Returned 719 results. Page 2 of 72.

Image of Averrhoa carambola photo by: Scott Bauer, USDA/ARS

Scott Bauer, USDA/ARS

(Carambola, Starfruit)

Carambola, also known as starfruit, is a tropical semi-evergreen tree native to Sri Lanka, Malaysia and southeastern Asia. It is a medium sized, slow growing, ackwardly-branching tree that puts forth leaf stalks with alternating green, finely haired leaves. Its fragrant pink-violet flowers are borne in small clusters on reddish stalks in spring and summer. Orange-yellow oblong, star-shaped fruits with waxy skin develop throughout the warm months and may continue into winter. Trees typically need...

Image of Carica papaya photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Papaya)

Papaya is a small, short-lived tropical tree-like herb bearing large melon-shaped fruits directly on its thick stem. The large scalloped, seven-lobed leaves top the hollow trunk. The fruit is edible and enzymes from the plant are used as meat tenderizer. Ordinarily you need both male and female plants for fruit production, however some plants have both gender flowers on the same plant.

Papaya needs a full sun to partial sun exposure, it appreciates heat. In the warm months, ensure it has plenty...

(Papaya, Solo Papaya)

Solo papaya is a small, short-lived self-fertile tropical tree bearing large melon-shaped fruits directly on its trunk. It was a cultivar produced in the early 20th century in Barbados and popularized in the trade via growers in Hawaii. 'Solo' fruit is of excellent quality with a red orange flesh. All seeds produce either a self-fertile bisexual plant or a female plant. The large scalloped, seven-lobed leaves top the hollow trunk. The fruit is edible and enzymes from the plant are used as meat tenderizer....

Image of Casimiroa edulis photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(White Sapote)

The tasty tropical fruit, white sapote, is a relatively obscure but close cousin of citrus. In addition to its fine fruit, it has a pretty form and multicolored bark. Native to the middle highland elevations of southern Mexico and Central America, this broadly branched tree is usually evergreen but frost and drought can cause leaf drop, so it is better listed as semi-evergreen. When mature, it attains a somewhat weeping form and curvaceous trunk and branches. Its bark is warty, thick and gray with...

Image of Citrullus lanatus

James Burghardt

(Moon and Stars Watermelon, Watermelon)

The dark-skinned, yellow-spotted fruits of 'Moon and Stars' watermelon are decorative as well as tasty. The large, ribbed, oblong to spherical melons are blackish green with numerous small yellow dots and one to several large yellow blotches. The foliage is also yellow-flecked. This heirloom melon typically has sweet, coarse, light-red flesh and dark brown seeds, but one strain of 'Moon and Stars' contains yellow flesh and white seeds. Fruits can weigh as much as 30 pounds (13 to 14 kg). Time from...

Image of Citrus photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Citrus)

The origin of Citrus is uncertain. It is believed that most species are from northeastern India eastward through the Malay Archipelago and south to Australia. There are between 20 and 25 species and hundreds of hybrids, varieties and cultivars. Several hybrids are naturally occurring. Citrus exists in sub-tropical areas with the exception of the pumelo which is more tropical in nature.

All members of this genus are large shrubs or trees. They are commonly evergreen (rarely deciduous)...

Image of Citrus

James H. Schutte

The origin of Citrus is uncertain. It is believed that most species are from northeastern India eastward through the Malay Archipelago and south to Australia. There are between 20 and 25 species and hundreds of hybrids, varieties and cultivars. Several hybrids are naturally occurring. Citrus exists in sub-tropical areas with the exception of the pumelo which is more tropical in nature.

All members of this genus are large shrubs or trees. They are commonly evergreen (rarely deciduous)...

Image of Citrus

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Temple Orange)

The origin of Citrus is uncertain. It is believed that most species are from northeastern India eastward through the Malay Archipelago and south to Australia. There are between 20 and 25 species and hundreds of hybrids, varieties and cultivars. Several hybrids are naturally occurring. Citrus exists in sub-tropical areas with the exception of the pumelo which is more tropical in nature.

All members of this genus are large shrubs or trees. They are commonly evergreen (rarely deciduous)...

Image of Citrus aurantiifolia photo by: Carol Cloud Bailey

Carol Cloud Bailey

(Lime, Mexican Lime)

Lime is a small, dense, bushy, spiny, evergreen shrub native to Southeast Asia and India. Gardeners typically prune it to create a more traditional tree habit. It bears large, waxy, slightly fragrant flowers primarily from spring to fall, often occurring just after a rainy period. Later, the fertlized flowers become rounded, very acidic green fruits that will mature to yellow. The leaves are deep green and typically have thorns at their bases. Crush the foliage and a pleasant aroma permeates. It...

Image of Citrus aurantiifolia

James H. Schutte

(Bearss Lime, Lime)

Bearrs lime is a small, dense, rounded, slightly spiny evergreen tree. It produces fragrant, waxy white flowers year-round, followed by lemon-sized, seedless, green to yellow-green, edible fruit. One of the most cold-sensitive citrus, it prefers sun, moist, well-drained soil, and protection from hard frost. As a container plant, it likes a soil-based potting mix and full light with protection from hot sun. It is grown for its fruit and as a small specimen tree or container plant. This is sometimes...