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Returned 719 results. Page 24 of 72.

Image of Malus domestica

Jessie Keith

(Apple, Ginger Gold Apple, Yellow Eating Apple)

Introduced in 1989, this chance seedling from Virginia is prized for its handsome, tasty, early apples. Ripening in mid- or late summer, the medium to large, somewhat pear-shaped fruits have greenish yellow skin that lacks the heavy spotting often found on yellow apples. The fine-textured, greenish white flesh of this dessert apple is firm, tender, crisp, juicy, and flavorful, with spicy undertones. The fruits keep moderately well in storage. The vigorous trees bear good crops each year. For maximum...

Image of Malus domestica

Jessie Keith

(Apple, Golden Delicious Apple, Yellow Eating Apple)

Golden delicious is an old time favorite eating apple, discovered as a chance seedling in West Virginia in 1914. This tree has a rounded to oval canopy and, like all domestic apples, originates from southwestern Asia.

In spring, it offers sweet, fragrant flowers of white and in fall produces crisp, sweet, juicy apples of golden yellow. These are harvested in mid-fall and store very well.

This tree prefers full sun and well-drained soil but will tolerate light shade and bouts of drought. For...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Antique Apple, Apple, Dessert Apple)

Originating in the Northeast United States in the late eighteenth or early nineteenth century, this exceptionally cold-hardy cultivar is still widely considered the best cider apple. Ripening in early to mid-autumn, the small to medium, spherical fruits have thick, greenish yellow skin with rough green or gold patches covering much of the surface. The fine-textured yellow flesh of this cider, cooking, or dessert apple is firm, crisp, juicy, and richly flavored, with a marked sweetness. The fruits...

Image of Malus domestica

Jessie Keith

(Apple, Eating Apple, Golden Supreme Apple)

This relatively new apple has earned attention for its flavor, sweetness and longevity in storage. The fruits are medium-sized and yellow, with a pink blush where sun reaches the skin. The flesh is firm, cream-colored, moderately crisp, juicy to very juicy, and browns slowly when exposed to air. The flavor is sweet to mildly sweet and pleasant with little or no detectable acid (unlike its parent, ‘Golden Delicious’). Harvest comes in early autumn. This apple can be kept for months in refrigerated...

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Mark Kane

(Apple, Eating Apple, Gold Rush Apple)

Introduced in 1994, this hybrid of 'Golden Delicious' produces tasty, long-keeping apples on disease resistant trees. Ripening in early to mid-autumn, the medium to large, conical to globular fruits have smooth, thin, greenish yellow skin that turns pure yellow in storage. The somewhat grainy, pale yellow flesh of this dessert apple is firm, crisp, juicy, and piquant, becoming less tart in storage. The fruits keep well for 6 months or more. The moderately vigorous, upright trees are annual bearers...

(Apple, Eating Apple, Goodland Apple)

Introduced in 1955 by the Morden Research Station in Morden, Manitoba, this open-pollinated seedling of 'Patten Greening' bears tasty apples on exceptionally cold-hardy trees. Ripening in late summer, the medium to large, rounded fruits have greenish-yellow skin heavily blushed with red. The flesh of this dessert or cooking apple is tender, crisp, juicy, and fragrant. The fruits do not keep long. The vigorous, spreading trees bear reliably every year. For maximum production, plant 'Goodland' near...

(Apple, Cooking Apple, Eating Apple, Gordon Apple)

A reliable apple for Southern California and other regions with mild winters, 'Gordon' bears large, greenish-yellow, red-flushed fruit in late summer. The flesh of this dessert or cooking apple is tender, crisp, juicy, and fragrant, with a sweet/tart flavor. The fruits do not keep long. The vigorous, spreading, pyramidal trees bear reliably every year. Plant 'Gordon' near another apple for cross-pollination.

There is nothing more satisfying than growing your own apple trees. The domestic apple...

Image of Malus domestica

Mark Kane

(Apple, Granny Smith Apple, Green Cooking Apple, Green Eating Apple)

There is no better apple for tart, sweet flavor and crisp texture than 'Granny Smith.' Discovered in Tasmania in 1868 by the Australian orchardist Maria Ann Sherwood, it is descended like all domestic apples from a deciduous species native to southwestern Asia. It has a rounded to oval canopy. Sherwood later married to obtain the surname Smith, and it wasn't until the 1890s that her nurtured apple cultivar became known as Granny Smith.

In spring, its branches offer sweet, fragrant flowers of white...

(Apple, Cider Apple, Cooking Apple, Gravenstein Apple)

Originating in Europe in the seventeenth century, 'Gravenstein' is still valued for its highly flavorful apples. Ripening in late summer, the large, rounded, somewhat oblong fruits have thin, tender, greenish-yellow to orange-yellow skin heavily streaked with red. The fine-textured yellow flesh of this dessert or cooking apple is firm, tender, crisp, juicy, and fragrant, with a rich piquant flavor. The fruits do not keep well. The large, upright, spreading trees bear reliably every year, and succeed...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Antique Apple, Apple, Cooking Apple, Dessert Apple)

Originating on Long Island, New York, in the early eighteenth century, this favorite of George Washington is still prized for its delicious apples. It sometimes goes under the name 'Newtown Pippin'.

Ripening in early to mid-fall, the medium to large, often oblong fruits have tough, dull green skin with russet speckling and tawny pink blushing. The fine-textured yellow flesh of this dessert or cooking apple is firm, tender, crisp, and juicy, with a lively tart flavor. The fruits keep well for...