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Returned 719 results. Page 30 of 72.

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple, Cooking Apple, Red Eating Apple, Red June Apple)

This heirloom variety from the Southeast United States is still popular for its flavorful, early-ripening apples. The small, oblong fruits are dark purple-red with yellowish undertones. The white, firm, fine-grained flesh of this dessert, cooking, and cider apple is juicy and tender with a spritely flavor. Carolina Red June apples ripen in early summer and last in storage for several weeks. The trees tend to bear heavily in alternate years, and often produce a second smaller crop in fall. Plant 'Carolina...

(Apple, Cider Apple, Cooking Apple, Red Eating Apple, Red Rome Apple)

Several mutations of 'Rome Beauty' bear apples of a darker and more solid red than those of their parent. Most of these 'Rome Beauty' sports are known as 'Red Rome.'

Ripening in early fall, the medium to large, spherical fruits have thick yellow skin completely overlaid with deep red. The firm yellowish flesh of this dessert, cooking, or drying apple is crisp, juicy, aromatic, and somewhat bland. The fruits keep well for several months, their flavor weakening after a few weeks in storage. The...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Antique Apple, Apple, Cooking Apple, Late-season Apple)

Originating in Newport, Rhode Island, before 1700, 'Rhode Island Greening' is still unsurpassed as a cooking and dessert apple. The large, spherical to flattish fruits are waxy grass-green with yellow undertones and a faint burgundy-red blush. The yellowish, firm, medium-grained flesh of this dessert and cooking apple is juicy and tender with a distinct, full, piquant flavor. Rhode Island Greenings ripen in late summer and early fall and keep well in storage for several months. The trees tend to...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple)

This renowned, flavorful English apple originated in Yorkshire in the late seventeenth century and is still widely grown. The medium to large, spherical fruits have smooth, greenish yellow, red-blushed skin with purple-red stripes. The yellowish-white, firm, medium-grained flesh of this dessert and cooking apple is juicy, very crisp, and aromatic with a distinct, robust, spicy flavor. The fruits ripen in late summer and early fall and keep well in storage for a month or more. The trees bear reliably...

(Apple, Cooking Apple, Rome Beauty Apple)

Originating in Lawrence County, Ohio, in the early nineteenth century, 'Rome Beauty' bears handsome apples at an early age.

Ripening in early fall, the medium to large, spherical fruits have thick yellow skin heavily overlaid with bright red. The yellowish flesh of this dessert, cooking, or drying apple is crisp, juicy, aromatic, and somewhat bland. The fruits keep well for several months, their flavor diminishing after a few weeks in storage. The small, vigorous, spreading trees bear heavily...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple)

America's oldest apple variety, 'Roxbury Russet' originated in Massachusetts around 1650 and is still valued as a cider and eating apple. The medium to large, oblong to spherical fruits have greenish-yellow skin with rough yellow-brown "russeting." The yellowish or greenish-white, firm, medium- to coarse-grained flesh of this dessert and cider apple is juicy and tender with a lively tangy-sweet flavor. The fruits ripen in late summer and early fall and keep well in storage for a several months. The...

(Apple, Eating Apple, Royal Gala Apple)

This cultivar, ‘Royal Gala,' is a small to medium-sized dessert apple with richly-flavored, crisp, juicy flesh. The skin is yellow overlain with broad, lacy stripes of red. The fruits mature in late summer and are best eaten fresh. They are also good for cooking. This is a semi-dwarf, hardy, deciduous tree.

Like most domestic apples, ‘Royal Gala’ grows and fruits best in full sun in average, well-drained soil. Mulch the tree with compost, composted manure, or shredded leaves to enrich the soil,...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple)

An all-American heirloom apple, ‘Salome’ was first discovered by Elias C. Hathaway in 1869 while he was cleaning out an area of an old plant nursery he had obtained in Ottawa, Illinois. He initially cut the parent plant down, but when sprouts sprang from the base he propagated a few. The resulting trees were first introduced as ‘Salome’ when Hathaway presented them to the Illinois State Horticultural Society in 1878. It is most admired for its consistently abundant crops of small to medium sized...

Image of Malus domestica

Jessie Keith

(Early Apple, Red Eating Apple, Sansa Apple)

The flavorful apples of this 1988 introduction ripen 2 weeks earlier than those of 'Gala.' Selected by the Morioka Research Station, Iwate, Japan, 'Sansa' resulted from a 1969 New Zealand cross between 'Gala' and 'Akene.'

The small to medium, conical to spherical fruits are greenish-yellow with a reddish blush and bright red streaks. The greenish-white, firm flesh of this dessert apple is juicy and tender with a tangy-sweet flavor. The fruits ripen in mid- to late summer and last a few weeks...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple)

An antique apple variety rarely grown today, this presumed seedling of 'Fameuse' originated in Vernon, Michigan, sometime before 1850. It produces modest to heavy crops of medium to large, flattish apples with red-blushed, carmine-streaked, pale yellow skin. The white, crisp, fine-textured flesh of this dessert apple is juicy and tender with a full, slightly tart flavor. The fruits ripen in early to mid-fall and keep until early winter. This variety typically produces large crops in alternate years....