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Returned 719 results. Page 33 of 72.

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple, Dessert Apple)

Rarely grown today, this dessert and cooking apple was popular in New York and New England in the nineteenth century. The medium to large, spherical to flattened fruits have pale greenish-yellow, white-dotted skin and crisp, juicy, fine-textured flesh. They have a lively, tart-sweet flavor.

White Pippin apples ripen in mid-autumn and keep in storage until late winter. The relatively large, dense-crowned trees bear a good crop most years. Plant 'White Pippin' near other apple varieties to insure...

(Apple, Dessert Apple, Winesap Apple)

This old apple, ‘Winesap,’ is named for the vinous (wine-like) flavor of its sweet, crisp flesh. The fruits are small to medium in size, good for eating fresh, baking and cider. The skin is yellow overlain almost entirely with deep red, The fruits mature in mid-autumn and keep exceptionally well in cold storage. This is a medium-sized deciduous tree that bears heavy crops dependably year after year.

Like most domestic apples, ‘Winesap’ grows and fruits best in full sun and average, well-drained...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple, Dessert Apple)

This old-time favorite bears distinctively aromatic apples whose yellow, rosy-blushed skin is typically marked by a top-to-bottom "suture line." Their firm, somewhat grainy, pale yellow flesh is juicy and crisp with a complex, mild, spicy-sweet flavor.

Winter Banana apples ripen in early to mid-autumn and keep in storage for several weeks. The medium-sized, open-crowned trees bear a good crop most years, and do well in both cold- and mild-winter areas. Plant 'Winter Banana' near other apple varieties...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple, Dessert Apple)

Rarely grown today, this dessert and cooking apple originated in Sussex, England. The medium-sized, conical fruits have greenish-yellow, red-blushed, gray-dotted skin and crisp, juicy, sweet-flavored flesh. They ripen in mid-autumn and keep in storage through winter. Plant 'Winter Pearmain' near other apple varieties to insure cross-pollination and maximum fruiting. It makes a good choice for home and specialty growers of rare antique apples.

There is nothing more satisfying than growing your...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple, Dessert Apple)

Originating in Winthrop, Maine, before 1800, this dessert apple is rarely grown today. The large, flattish fruits have pale yellow-green, scarlet-brushed skin and crunchy, sweet, richly flavored flesh. They ripen in early autumn and keep well in storage for several weeks. Plant 'Winthrop Greening' near other apple varieties to insure cross-pollination and maximum fruiting. This cold-hardy variety makes a good choice for home and specialty growers of rare antique apples.

There is nothing more...

Image of Malus domestica

Mark Kane

(Apple, Cider Apple, Cooking Apple, Wolf River Apple)

A popular variety in the Southern Appalachians, this mild-flavored cooking apple originated as a seedling in Fremont County, Wisconsin, in the mid-nineteenth century. The exceptionally large, cylindrical fruits have pale yellow, red-blushed, carmine-streaked skin and soft, grainy, creamy-white flesh. They ripen in late summer and are poor "keepers." The apples are borne on spreading, flat-headed, cold-hardy trees that are resistant to scab, mildew, fire blight, and cedar apple rust. Plant this partially...

(Apple, Cider Apple, Eating Apple, Yates Apple)

A long-time favorite in southern United States orchards and kitchens, this small, flavorful apple originated in Fayette County, Georgia, around 1844. The round to flattish fruits have pale yellow, heavily red-blushed skin and tender, juicy, aromatic flesh. They ripen in early fall and keep all winter. The apples are abundantly borne on vigorous trees that grow well in mild-winter climates. Plant 'Yates' near other apple varieties to insure cross-pollination and maximum fruiting. It makes a good choice...

(Apple, Cider Apple, Cooking Apple, Yellow Eating Apple, Yellow Horse Apple)

Also known as 'Horse', this summer-ripening, heat-tolerant apple has long been grown and cherished by backyard gardeners in the Southeast United States. The medium to large, slightly flattened fruits have thick yellow skin and firm, juicy, tart/sweet flesh. They are good for eating, drying, cooking, and preserving. Plant this heirloom cultivar near other apple varieties to insure cross-pollination and maximum fruiting. It makes a good choice for home and specialty growers in areas with mild winters...

Image of Malus domestica

Russell Stafford

(Apple, Dessert Apple)

Originating on Long Island, New York, in the early eighteenth century, this favorite of George Washington is still prized for its delicious apples. It sometimes goes under the name 'Newtown Pippin'. Some references consider it to be synonymous with 'Green Newtown'.

Ripening in early to mid-fall, the medium to large, often oblong fruits have tough, yellow skin with russet speckling and tawny pink blushing. The fine-textured yellow flesh of this dessert or cooking apple is firm, tender, crisp,...

(Apple, Cider Apple, Yellow Eating Apple, Yellow Transparent Apple)

An long-time favorite in much of the United States, this tart-flavored, early-ripening apple was introduced from Russia in 1870. The medium-sized, tapered fruits have waxy, pale yellow skin and juicy, tender, pure white flesh. They ripen in early to midsummer and are poor keepers. The apples are abundantly borne on small, scab-resistant trees that grow well in most climatic regions of the United States. Plant this partially self-fertile cultivar near other apple varieties to insure cross-pollination...