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Plants Matching fruit

Returned 719 results. Page 39 of 72.

(Sweet Cherry)

This may be the most exciting backyard cherry in America! It packs three punches: a self-fruitful nature, black sweet cherries and a naturally small stature. ‘Lapins’ was developed by the breeder of the most famous sweet cherry for canning, ‘Stella.’ Its sweet dark cherries also resist splitting.

Deep green, shiny, serrated leaves cover the canopy of this tree throughout the growing season. In spring, it bursts into heavy bloom with clusters of sweetly scented white flowers that are five-petaled,...

Image of Prunus avium

Jesse Saylor

(Sweet Cherry)

These cherries are literally the cream of the crop when it comes to beauty and flavor. The yellow-fleshed ‘Rainier’ cherries cost so much to buy at the market, they’re worth the effort to grow, though they can be devilishly difficult to culture outside of the Pacific Northwest. This exceptional semi-dwarf cherry was developed at Washington State University as a cross between ‘Van’ and ‘Bing’, the two most widely cultivated commercial cherries. It has larger fruit than ‘Bing’, creamy yellow flesh...

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John Rickard

(Sweet Cherry)

The yellow flesh cherry ‘Royal Ann’ is primarily grown for the Maraschino cherry industry but many consider its fruit very similar to that of ‘Rainier.’ It us actually an old French variety, formerly known as ‘Napoleon’, that was brought west with immigrants who later cultivated it locally and renamed it. The semi-dwarf trees proved tough and hardy enough for the Oregon frontier.

Deep green, shiny, serrated leaves cover the canopy of this tree throughout the growing season. In spring, it bursts...

Image of Prunus avium

Willis Orchard Co.

(Sweet Cherry)

This was among the very first self-fertile sweet cherry cultivars developed, meaning it does not need a second tree to set fruit. Naturally, 'Stella' quickly became popular in both commercial and home orchards. It is known for abundant yields of delightfully sweet fruit on easy to grow, vigorous, compact trees.

Deep green, shiny, serrated leaves cover the canopy of this tree throughout the growing season. In spring, it bursts into heavy bloom with clusters of sweetly scented white flowers...

(Sweet Cherry)

This hardy cherry is both a fine fruit bearer but also serves as the universal pollinator for most other varieties. The fruit is slightly smaller than ‘Bing’ but bears heavily. Its abundant yields of delightfully sweet cherries are borne on easy to grow, vigorous trees that are also highly ornamental.

Deep green, shiny, serrated leaves cover the canopy of this tree throughout the growing season. In spring, it bursts into heavy bloom with clusters of sweetly scented white flowers that are five-petaled,...

Image of Prunus cerasus photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Pie Cherry, Sour Cherry, Tart Cherry)

Grown since antiquity for its tart fruit, sour cherry is a small deciduous tree known only in cultivation. It probably originated in eastern Europe or western Asia from a hybrid between sweet cherry, Prunus avium, and ground cherry, Prunus fruticosa.

The shiny, dark green, oval leaves of this hardy tree have toothed edges and a pointed tip. They flush in early to mid-spring, just as the abundant cupped, white, five-petaled flowers open. Spherical, long-stemmed fruits follow...

(Early Richmond Tart Cherry, Sour Cherry)

Sour cherry ‘Early Richmond’ bears an abundance of tart, flavorful, sweet/tart fruit up to two weeks earlier than the popular French variety, ‘Montmorency’. Cultivated since ancient times, sour cherries probably originated in eastern Europe or western Asia from a hybrid between sweet cherry, Prunus avium, and ground cherry, Prunus fruticosa.

This deciduous tree possesses a round, spreading form, thickly clad with shiny, toothed, dark green foliage. Its fragrant, cupped,...

(Meteor Tart Cherry, Sour Cherry)

Bred to endure the severe winters of the northern Midwest United States, this hybrid of the famous 'Montmorency' sour cherry was introduced in 1952 by the University of Minnesota. Cultivated since ancient times, sour cherries probably originated in eastern Europe or western Asia from a hybrid between sweet cherry, Prunus avium, and ground cherry, Prunus fruticosa.

This small, rounded, exceptionally cold-hardy tree has shiny, oval, dark green leaves that emerge in early to...

Image of Prunus cerasus

James Burghardt

(Montmorency Tart Cherry, Sour Cherry)

One of the most widely-grown pie or sour cherries, ‘Montmorency’ is prized for its heavy crop of tart, flavorful, juicy red fruits which are a seasonal treat for pies and desserts. This selection originated in France in the 17th century and trees were introduced in the United States around 1760. Cultivated since ancient times, sour cherries probably originated in eastern Europe or western Asia from a hybrid between sweet cherry, Prunus avium, and ground cherry, Prunus fruticosa....

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Mark A. Miller

(Northstar Tart Cherry, Sour Cherry)

Bred to endure the severe winters of the northern Midwest United States, 'Northstar' bears an abundance of snowy flowers and tart cherries on dwarf trees that fit beautifully into suburban gardens and limited spaces. It was introduced in 1950 by the University of Minnesota. Cultivated since ancient times, sour cherries probably originated in eastern Europe or western Asia from a hybrid between sweet cherry, Prunus avium, and ground cherry, Prunus fruticosa.

This small, rounded,...