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Returned 719 results. Page 40 of 72.

Image of Prunus domestica photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Plum, Prune Plum)

The European plum is a great stone fruit for the home gardener. It has been cultivated for centuries but originates from western Asia and near the Caucasus Mountains. The earliest trees were brought to the United States with colonists; Spanish missionaries on the west coast and the English on the east coast. Today, commercial orchards exist across temperate regions worldwide. Most North America production orchards are in the Central Valley of California.

The small to medium-sized tree is deciduous...

(Plum)

A reliable producer of large, sweet, juicy plums, 'Brooks' bears white flowers in spring followed by plump red- or purple-skinned, white-dusted fruits. The delicious, yellow flesh is distinctively flavored, with just a hint of tartness. Ripening in early to midsummer, this is a great variety for drying and canning, and also delicious eaten straight from the tree.

Plums prefer full sun and fertile, well-drained soils. They require regular moisture to ensure good fruit production and to prevent...

(Plum)

If there is an American heirloom, this green plum is definitely a blue blood. It has been cultivated since the Revolution as a gourmet dessert fruit typically canned or preserved, but is sweet and juicy enough to eat fresh off the tree. It is grouped with the European plums, native to western Asia. Trees came from England to America in the 18th century, and this variety has changed little since. Early Green matures before many other canning plums. It is easily grown over most of America in home gardens....

(Plum)

The plump, oval, purple-blue fruits of 'Early Italian' ripen approximately two weeks earlier than those of ‘Italian Prune’, the standard prune-plum variety. The yellow-green flesh turns an appealing dark red when cooked. These plums are ideal for canning and drying, and also delicious when eaten straight from the tree.

Plums prefer full sun and fertile, well-drained soils. They require regular moisture to ensure good fruit production and to prevent cracking of skin. Prune in winter to remove...

(Plum)

The standard variety used for commercial prune production, ‘Italian Prune’ forms a medium-sized tree with upright branches. Attractive white flowers in spring are followed by an abundant crop of sweet, oval, purple-blue fruits which hang from the branches in large clusters. These delicious plums are also ideal for cooking, canning, freezing and preserves.

Plums prefer full sun and fertile, well-drained soils. They require regular moisture to ensure good fruit production and to prevent cracking...

(Plum)

This is a very old American variety once considered the best of all dessert plums. Sadly it proved too tender for commercial growers so it fell out of favor except in home orchards. This tree is grouped with the European plums, native to western Asia, then came to America with colonists. Jefferson was bred in New York in 1825. It is easily grown over most of America, producing a medium deciduous tree with upright branching and small green leaves.

Jefferson is not self-fruitful and requires...

(Plum)

Testing in Wisconsin has proved this is indeed the most cold hardy of all European plums. It’s grown for canning and preserves but is sweet and juicy enough to eat right off the tree. This native of western Asia came to America with early English and Spanish colonials on both coasts. Mount Royal is a contemporary variety that adapts to virtually every state making a versatile home garden fruit. This is a small tree with upright branching and small green leaves that fits nicely into the average backyard.

Mount...

(Plum)

An ideal variety for the home and market gardener, ‘Seneca’ produces unusually large fruit which are of outstanding eating quality. This medium-sized tree yields a generous, midsummer crop of warm, ruby-red plums with succulent, very juicy yellow flesh. Although not the best for processing, they are almost unbeatable for fresh eating. The fruits are preceded by an attractive spring display of white flowers.

Plums prefer full sun and fertile, well-drained soils. They require regular moisture...

(Plum)

Consistently heavy production has made ‘Stanley’ one of the most popular plums for canning, drying and fresh eating. Developed in New York at the Geneva Agricultural Station, this variety is well-suited to the growing conditions of the northeastern United States, and an ideal choice for the home and market gardener. It forms a medium-sized tree laden with white flowers in spring. These give way to a generous, early summer crop of large, purple-blue fruit with deliciously sweet, yellow flesh.

...

(Plum)

This very old plum variety has managed to remain in cultivation into the modern era because its modestly sized fruit maintains such a high sugar content. It is an early form of the native European plum that is traced back to western Asia. Originating in Germany, it came to America with immigrants who spread it throughout the colonies. It is among the sweetest of all European varieties and valued both for fresh eating and canning. This old variety produces a small tree with upright branching and small...