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Plants Matching grass

Returned 286 results. Page 19 of 29.

Image of Nassella tenuissima

Jessie Keith

(Finestem Needlegrass, Mexican Feather Grass, Pony Tails Grass)

Grown for its fine, hair-like blades and beautiful feathery floral plumes, ‘Pony Tails’ is a heat-loving grass that is sure to please. The fine, bright green strands of this perennial bunch grass cascade loosely like flowing hair. In summer it bears soft, fluffy, silver-green panicles with long awns (bristle-like hairs) that move in the slightest breeze.

A native of the dry, open prairies of the southwestern United States and rocky slopes of Mexico, Mexican feather grass can withstand substantial...

Image of Oryza photo by: Keith Weller, USDA/ARS

Keith Weller, USDA/ARS

(Rice)

Cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) is among the 19 annual and perennial grasses that make up this genus. All are native to tropical and subtropical latitudes of Asia and Africa.

These grasses form spreading clumps of upright to lax stems furnished with long, blade-shaped, erect to arching leaves. Branching panicles of greenish flower "spikelets" appear at the stem tips, typically in summer. Each spikelet consists of a single, inconspicuous, wind-pollinated flower encased in a tough, ovoid...

Image of Oryza sativa photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Rice)

Arguably the world's most important crop, cultivated rice has been a staple of Asian diets for more than 7,000 years. This annual grass was probably first domesticated in Southeast Asia and southern China from wild populations of the perennial Oryza rufipogon. Rice is now cultivated and consumed globally, but the bulk of the world's crop still originates in Asia. The lower Mississippi Valley and north-central California are centers of rice production in the United States.

This rhizomatous...

(Rice)

An ornamental variety of the world's most important crop, 'Nigrescens' is grown not for its grain but for its handsome deep-hued leaves.

This rhizomatous grass forms spreading clumps of upright stems lined with long, slender, deep-bronze leaves. Conspicuous, arching panicles of greenish flower "spikelets" appear at the stem tips in summer. Each spikelet consists of a single, inconspicuous, wind-pollinated flower enclosed in a tough, ovoid, flat-sided husk. The spikelets ripen to pale brown....

(Rice)

Arguably the world's most important crop, cultivated rice has been a staple of Asian diets for more than 7,000 years. This annual grass was probably first domesticated in Southeast Asia and southern China from wild populations of the perennial Oryza rufipogon. Rice is now cultivated and consumed globally, but the bulk of the world's crop still originates in Asia. The lower Mississippi Valley and north-central California are centers of rice production in the United States.

This rhizomatous...

Image of Otatea acuminata photo by: Maureen Gilmer

Maureen Gilmer

(Clumping Bamboo, Mexican Weeping Bamboo)

Soft and fluffy with a decidedly weeping habit, this favorite of designers working in tropical or frost-free climates is unique among the bamboo clan. Mexican weeping bamboo is unsurpassed for unique texture that is highly valued and exaggerated when juxtaposing large-leaved architectural plants. This semi-evergreen bamboo is native to Mexico and intolerant of prolonged hard freezes in winter. Very fine-textured foliage on arching culm-stems -- drooping nearly to the ground -- may obscure the culm...

Image of Panicum photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Panicum)

This genus contains almost 500 species of annual or perennial grasses. Some species are useful as ornamentals, like the ever-popular Panicum virgatum, or Virginia switch grass. Other species, like the annual Panicum miliaceum (millet), are useful grains. These grasses may be adapted to a wide variety of climates, topographies, light-levels and soil conditions.

Image of Panicum amarum photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Bitter Panicgrass, Coastal Panicgrass)

Bitter panicgrass's tall stems and leaves of mild blue-green color are topped by thin spires of yellow-green spikelet flowers by very late summer. A perennial warm-season grass that forms a clump, it is native to the southeastern third of the United States, eastern Mexico and the Caribbean islands, in coastal and inland sandy soils.

The grass blades are long and green to blue-green, held upright but arch over midway in their length. By late summer, a tall, think flower spike rises up from the...

Image of Panicum amarum

James Burghardt

(Bitter Panicgrass, Coastal Panicgrass)

The steel blue leaves of ‘Dewey Blue’ make this selection of Bitter Panicgrass a striking ornamental, especially when it is topped by plumes of yellow-green spikelet flowers in very late summer. A perennial, warm-season grass that forms a clump, the parent species is native to the southeastern third of the United States. This selection tends to readily spread by rhizomes (underground stems) to create a large, flopping mass of leaves.

The leaves are long, narrow and powdery steel blue, held upright...

Image of Panicum virgatum photo by: Peggy Greb, USDA/ARS

Peggy Greb, USDA/ARS

(Switchgrass)

If you have a spacious garden and want a pleasing airy ornamental grass, look no further. The highly adaptable and ornamental switchgrass offers interest throughout most of the growing season. This very hardy perennial bunchgrass is native to the fields and prairies of the United States and Canada. It has a tall upright habit and is popular for native gardens with a soft and natural feel.

The blades of switchgrass are long, narrow, densely packed and upright. Foliage color varies from medium...