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Returned 286 results. Page 25 of 29.

Image of Phyllostachys aurea photo by: Felder Rushing

Felder Rushing

(Golden Bamboo, Running Bamboo)

This lovely bamboo offers elegance to Asian inspired landscapes and gardens. It is native to China, primarily north of the Yangtze Valley, where summers are very hot. The name "aurea" means "yellow" and refers to the yellow-green coloring of the foliage and golden canes that offer a bright look in the garden.

Golden bamboo spreads by woody rhizomes that can travel both under and above ground. A single plant will quickly form dense stands of upright, jointed, woody stems, or culms. The stands...

Image of Phyllostachys nigra photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Black Bamboo, Running Bamboo)

Black bamboo looks beautiful throughout the year. Its tall, attractive green and black stems (culms) are glossy and offer vertical architectural appeal. This species has been cultivated for centuries in its native China and few wild populations are known to exist. It was first introduced as an ornamental in the United States in the early nineteenth century and has become naturalized in several southeastern states, such as Georgia and South Carolina. There are many desirable cultivated varieties to...

(Changsa Firm Bamboo, Running Bamboo, Shrubby Bamboo)

Purple shoots and slightly zig-zag stems are a few ornamental highlights of this shrubby, running-rhizome bamboo. Widely cultivated across eastern Asia, it's most possibly native to China's Hunnan Province, as alluded to by the common name, Changsha firm bamboo.

The evergreen foliage is narrow and lance-shaped, a medium green in color. In spring, new shoots emerge from the ground. They are initially purple, with some white powdery bloom, and then the stems (or more appropriately, culms) elongate,...

Image of Poa pratensis photo by: Forest & Kim Starr

Forest & Kim Starr

(Kentucky Bluegrass)

Likely the best known of all cool-season turfgrasses, Kentucky bluegrass is a spreading, perennial with a fine texture and beautiful blue-green color. The origin of this popular grass is complicated. It is native to both Europe and parts of northern North America but has been widely used for turf and agricultural fodder, so it has been introduced across the whole of North America, from Alaska to Florida, though it is less common in the Gulf states and arid Southwest. Wild populations can be found...

Image of Saccharum arundinaceum photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Hardy Sugarcane)

The dense, imposing hardy sugarcane creates a massive clump of arching leaves and huge pink plumes from late summer to autumn. It naturally grows on hillsides, dry stream beds and sandy riverbanks, from India and southern China to Indonesia.

The tall stalks of this formidable grass have coarse sheaths and long, dark gray-green leaves. Each blade is arching, floppy and slender. The blade's undersides are softly fuzzy. After the autumnal equinox, the stalks produce tall, impressive wispy flower...

Image of Saccharum giganteum photo by: James Burghardt

James Burghardt

(Sugarcane Plumegrass)

Tall rosy pink flower plumes become silvery peach seed heads, making the sugarcane plumegrass particularly ornamental from early summer to fall. This erect, dramatic grass is native to the soggy meadows, swales and lake shores of the southeastern United States, from New York to Texas and Florida. It has a rhizomatous root system that spreads to form substantial clumps over time.

Sugarcane plumegrass has a wispy and slender habit, unless the clump is large with numerous leafy stems. The thin,...

Image of Saccharum officinarum photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Sugarcane)

Imagine a culinary world lacking table sugar, molasses or rum. Perhaps there would be fewer smiles and cavities. All these sweeteners originate from the sweet juices of sugarcane, a perennial grass believed to originate from southeast Asia, which is now grown in warm regions worldwide. it is a tall, bold, warm-season grass that resembles bamboo.

Sugarcane was cultivated in India as early as 2992 B.C. Alexander the Great brought sugar back to Europe, where it was referred to as "the honey from...

Image of Saccharum officinarum

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Sugarcane)

Imagine a culinary world lacking table sugar, molasses or rum. Perhaps there would be fewer smiles and cavities. All these sweeteners originate from the sweet juices of sugarcane, a perennial grass believed to originate from southeast Asia, which is now grown in warm regions worldwide. it is a tall, bold, warm-season grass that resembles bamboo.

Sugarcane was cultivated in India as early as 2992 B.C. Alexander the Great brought sugar back to Europe, where it was referred to as "the honey from...

Image of Saccharum ravennae photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Hardy Pampas Grass, Plume Grass, Ravennagrass)

Few ornamental grasses make a bigger statement in the garden than this stately Mediterranean native. Tall, dense mounds of slender, gray-green, fountainesque foliage give rise in late summer to towering stems topped with large feathery heads of silvery, purple-tinged flowers. The show continues into winter as the leaves and seed heads turn tawny-beige with purple and auburn highlights.

Plume grass does best in full sun and rich, well drained soil. Use it as a specimen, herbaceous hedge, or back-of-border...

Image of Sasa pygmaea photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Dwarf Bamboo)

Groundcover bamboos such as this one are a blessing due to their easy care, rapid growth and gracefulness, but may need control, depending on conditions. An Asian species, Sasa pygmaea has upright canes bearing narrow, green leaves on short branches. Pygmy bamboo spreads by rhizomes (underground stems) to make dense, rounded clumps.

Like other bamboos, this is a gregarious flowering plant, which means that all Sasa pygmaea worldwide bloom at exactly the same time, though...