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Returned 3472 results. Page 225 of 348.

Image of Ribes uva-crispa

Ulysses Prentiss Hedrick et al., USDA Corvallis

(Gooseberry)

Currants make excellent subjects for the ornamental or culinary garden. Deciduous and evergreen shrubs from the temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere and the uplands of South America, they are most commonly grown for their small, spherical, often translucent berries, which are usually edible. The several-seeded fruits are black, red, green, yellow, or purple. Many currants are well worth growing for their showy clusters of small, four- or five-lobed, pink, white, red, or yellow flowers, which...

Image of Ribes uva-crispa

Ulysses Prentiss Hedrick et al., USDA Corvallis

(Gooseberry)

Currants make excellent subjects for the ornamental or culinary garden. Deciduous and evergreen shrubs from the temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere and the uplands of South America, they are most commonly grown for their small, spherical, often translucent berries, which are usually edible. The several-seeded fruits are black, red, green, yellow, or purple. Many currants are well worth growing for their showy clusters of small, four- or five-lobed, pink, white, red, or yellow flowers, which...

Image of Ribes uva-crispa

Ulysses Prentiss Hedrick et al., USDA Corvallis

(Gooseberry)

Currants make excellent subjects for the ornamental or culinary garden. Deciduous and evergreen shrubs from the temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere and the uplands of South America, they are most commonly grown for their small, spherical, often translucent berries, which are usually edible. The several-seeded fruits are black, red, green, yellow, or purple. Many currants are well worth growing for their showy clusters of small, four- or five-lobed, pink, white, red, or yellow flowers, which...

Image of Ribes uva-crispa

Ulysses Prentiss Hedrick et al., USDA Corvallis

(Gooseberry)

Currants make excellent subjects for the ornamental or culinary garden. Deciduous and evergreen shrubs from the temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere and the uplands of South America, they are most commonly grown for their small, spherical, often translucent berries, which are usually edible. The several-seeded fruits are black, red, green, yellow, or purple. Many currants are well worth growing for their showy clusters of small, four- or five-lobed, pink, white, red, or yellow flowers, which...

(Jostaberry)

Grown for its flavorful berries, this small to medium-sized deciduous shrub (commonly known as jostaberry) combines many of the best traits of its parents, black currant (Ribes nigrum) and gooseberry (Ribes uva-crispa). The spineless branches bear inconspicuous greenish and purple flowers in spring, followed by tart, juicy, small-seeded fruits, which ripen to purple-black or wine-red in summer. Larger and more abundant than those of Ribes nigrum, the green-fleshed fruits...

Image of Robinia photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Locust)

Robinia commonly known as locust is a genus of plant family Fabaceae – the pea and bean family. The plants are native throughout much of North America and Mexico. The number of species which make up the genus is disputed by experts, some claim there are as few as four species, other say there are 20. Linnaeus, the father of scientific classification, named the genus in honor of Jean Robin, botanist to King Henry IV of France. Robin was the first to bring locust trees to Europe.

Locusts...

Image of Robinia hispida photo by: Russell Stafford

Russell Stafford

(Bristly Locust)

The beautiful dangling pink flower clusters give this rugged, sun loving deciduous shrub a fabulous season of bloom in return for virtually no care. As with most American natives, it is super adapted to its homeland, the heart of the Southeastern states where it is found in drier, forested regions. Unlike its invasive, exotic cousins, this arching large shrub or small tree can be used in warm climates without reservation. Its blue-green compound leaves take on a yellow green coloring in the fall....

(Doubtful Locust)

Robinia commonly known as locust is a genus of plant family Fabaceae – the pea and bean family. The plants are native throughout much of North America and Mexico. The number of species which make up the genus is disputed by experts, some claim there are as few as four species, other say there are 20. Linnaeus, the father of scientific classification, named the genus in honor of Jean Robin, botanist to King Henry IV of France. Robin was the first to bring locust trees to Europe.

Locusts...

Image of Robinia x ambigua

Jesse Saylor

(Doubtful Locust)

Robinia commonly known as locust is a genus of plant family Fabaceae – the pea and bean family. The plants are native throughout much of North America and Mexico. The number of species which make up the genus is disputed by experts, some claim there are as few as four species, other say there are 20. Linnaeus, the father of scientific classification, named the genus in honor of Jean Robin, botanist to King Henry IV of France. Robin was the first to bring locust trees to Europe.

Locusts...

Image of Rosa photo by: flickr.com/elfpunk999

flickr.com/elfpunk999

(Rose)

One of the oldest cultivated ornamentals, Rosa is a broad and complex genus with over 100 species and thousands of cultivated varieties. Roses are woody shrubs or rambling climbers that originate from Northwestern Africa, Asia, Europe and North America. They are either deciduous, evergreen or semi-evergreen, and all have stems lined with sharp woody thorns.

Roses have been grown for their beauty, food, perfume and medicine for nearly 5000 years. Early rose references and depictions...