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Returned 3472 results. Page 317 of 348.

Image of Syringa x prestoniae

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Agnes Smith Lilac, Preston's Lilac)

A late-blooming, rock-hardy lilac with showy white blooms, this 1970 introduction from Owen M. Rogers of the University of New Hampshire bears masses of branching pyramidal flower clusters at its stem tips in late spring. The fragrant flowers open more than a week after those of common lilac. This is one of many cultivars of Syringa x josiflexa, the hybrid between nodding lilac (Syringa komarowii ssp. reflexa) and Hungarian lilac (Syringa josikaea) first...

Image of Syringa x prestoniae

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Donald Wyman Lilac, Preston's Lilac)

A late-blooming, rock-hardy lilac with showy purple blooms, this 1944 introduction from famed hybridizer Frank Skinner of Dropmore, Manitoba, bears masses of branching pyramidal flower clusters at its stem tips in late spring. The fragrant flowers open more than a week after those of common lilac and are borne on the current year's growth. This is one of many cultivars of Syringa x prestoniae, the hybrid between nodding lilac (Syringa komarowii ssp. reflexa) and...

Image of Syringa x prestoniae

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Isabella Lilac, Preston's Lilac)

A late-blooming, rock-hardy lilac with showy lilac-purple blooms, this 1928 introduction from the renowned English-Canadian horticulturist Isabella Preston bears masses of branching pyramidal flower clusters at its stem tips in late spring. The fragrant flowers open more than a week after those of common lilac and are borne on the current year's growth. This is the original named cultivar of Syringa x prestoniae, the hybrid between nodding lilac (Syringa komarowii ssp....

Image of Syringa x prestoniae

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Miss Canada Lilac, Preston's Lilac)

This large, deciduous shrub is distinguished by its prolific and beautiful blooms. In late spring to early summer, ‘Miss Canada’ produces many clusters of subtly sweet smelling, deep pink flowers that are rose-red in bud. These bloom later than the common lilac and prefer full sun and well drained, neutral to slightly acidic soil. Be sure to prune them in summer after they flower. Incorporate them into the landscape as feature plants, in mixed borders or as hedges.

(Nocturne Lilac, Preston's Lilac)

A late-blooming, rock-hardy lilac with showy blue-purple blooms, this 1936 introduction from the Morden Research Station in Manitoba bears masses of branching pyramidal flower clusters at its stem tips in late spring. The fragrant flowers open more than a week after those of common lilac and are borne on the current year's growth. This is one of many cultivars of Syringa x prestoniae, the hybrid between nodding lilac (Syringa komarowii ssp. reflexa) and late lilac...

Image of Syringa x prestoniae

Lottah Nursery, Australia

(Preston's Lilac, Telimena Lilac)

A late-blooming, rock-hardy lilac with showy pale pink blooms, this 1970 introduction from Polish hybridizer Wladyslaw Bugala bears masses of branching pyramidal flower clusters at its stem tips in late spring. The fragrant flowers open more than a week after those of common lilac and are borne on the current year's growth. This is one of many cultivars of Syringa x prestoniae, the hybrid between nodding lilac (Syringa komarowii ssp. reflexa) and late lilac (Syringa...

Image of Syzygium paniculatum photo by: Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

Michael Charters, www.calflora.net

(Australian Brush Cherry, Brush Cherry)

Australian brush cherry is a small to medium-sized, evergreen tree that produces edible, dark pink to reddish purple fruits. It is native to Queensland, Australia and is where it is commonly sheared and pruned into a shrubby form for hedges and screens. If allowed to maintain a tree form, it has a single trunk and develops a bushy, oval canopy.

The glossy leaves of this tough, drought tolerant tree are small, glossy and lance-shaped. The new leaves are bronze-pink and turn green, sometimes with...

Image of Syzygium paniculatum

James H. Schutte

(Globulus Brush Cherry)

The slow-growing 'Globulus' is a compact brush cherry with rich dark green leaves. This evergreen shrub is highly valued for topiary and bonsai. Australian in origin, it produces edible, dark pink to reddish purple fruits and is tough and easy to grow.

The glossy leaves of Australian brush cherry are small, glossy and lance-shaped. The new leaves are bronze-pink and turn green, sometimes with a bronze tint, when fully mature. It produces brushy clusters of white flowers throughout the year, as...

Image of Syzygium paniculatum

John Rickard

(Brush Cherry, Monterey Bay Brush Cherry)

The vigorous 'Monterey Bay' is an exceptional selection of brush cherry with deep green, lustrous leaves. It was selected in 1988 at the Monterey Bay Nursery in Watsonville, California. Australian in origin, it produces edible, dark pink to reddish purple fruits and is tough and easy to grow.

The glossy leaves of Australian brush cherry are small, glossy and lance-shaped. It produces brushy clusters of white flowers throughout the year, as long as temperatures and warm and conditions favorable....

(Crepe Jasmine, Tabernaemontana )

Exotically fragrant large flowers grace this tropical shrub. Native to Madagascar this shrub is rare in gardens.

This is an evergreen, many-branched shrub or small tree with lovely shiny leaves. They are opposite each other on the stem and unequal in size. The leaves are lance-shaped or oval, deep green and smooth with prominent veins. Open, rounded flowers are produced in loose clusters in the forks of the branches. They are white and shaped like a pinwheel with five separate petals that form...