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Plants Matching herb

Returned 187 results. Page 13 of 19.

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Rosemary)

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants for the garden. It also doubles as an ornamental with its needle-like foliage, ridged stems, and pale lavender flowers that appear in late winter or spring. Technically a medium-sized woody shrub, it's native to the chaparral lands of southern Europe and North Africa where growing conditions are somewhat arid and the ground porous and well-drained. It’s also adapted to the seaside...

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

James H. Schutte

(Rosemary)

Rosemary is one of the great culinary herbs for the garden, and the upright cultivar 'Arp' has the added appeal of an open habit that if kept pinched, makes an excellent accent plant in the border. Its ornamental appeal nearly matches its herbal offerings. Rosemary 'Arp' is also noted for its good cold hardiness.

Throughout the year this native to the Mediterranean has dark green to gray green needle-like leaves, which are potently fragrant from afar. In mid-spring to early summer, small but pretty...

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

John Rickard

(Rosemary)

Often just referred to as 'Blue Spires', this vigorous, cold-hardy rosemary also boasts loavely lavender-blue flowers, a dense upright habit and good disease resistance. It was first introduced by Allan M. Armitage of Athens, Georgia around 1999.

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants for the garden. It also doubles as an ornamental with its needle-like foliage, ridged stems, and pale lavender flowers that appear...

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

James H. Schutte

(Rosemary)

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants for the garden. It also doubles as an ornamental with its needle-like foliage, ridged stems, and pale lavender flowers that appear in late winter or spring. Technically a medium-sized woody shrub, it's native to the chaparral lands of southern Europe and North Africa where growing conditions are somewhat arid and the ground porous and well-drained. It’s also adapted to the seaside...

(Blue Boy Rosemary, Dwarf Rosemary, Rosemary)

Noted as being the most compact of the cultivated rosemaries, 'Blue Boy' is very small and has tiny evergreen leaves of green to grey-green and pale lavender-blue flowers that bloom early in the season. It is a slow-growing, more cold-tender selection well-suited to small rock gardens and container plantings.

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants for the garden. It also doubles as an ornamental with its needle-like...

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

James H. Schutte

(Rosemary)

Bred in Scotland, the compact 'Capercaillie' has bright green needle-like foliage and offers loads vibrant blue flowers early in the season. Its small size makes it perfect for containers and gardens with limited space.

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants for the garden. It also doubles as an ornamental with its needle-like foliage, ridged stems, and pale lavender flowers that appear in late winter or spring....

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

James H. Schutte

(Rosemary)

The beauty of this vigorous rosemary far outweighs its culinary value. The fully evergreen, semi-trailing 'Collingwood Ingram' has relatively broad, rich green leaves that smell of pine. Early in the season it produces loads of deep blue flowers. This is an excellent cultivar for training and bonsai. Unaltered specimens develop dense, spreading habits.

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants for the garden....

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

James H. Schutte

(Rosemary)

The beauty of this vigorous rosemary matches its culinary value. The fully evergreen, compact 'Dancing Waters' has fragrant, fine leaves. Early in the season it produces loads of dark blue flowers. This is an excellent cultivar for training and bonsai. Unaltered specimens develop dense, bushy habits. This is a hybrid of the two popular cultivars, 'Lockwood' and 'Huntington.'

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants...

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

James H. Schutte

(Rosemary)

A truly prostrate habit and marked hardiness make 'Haifa' especially desirable for containers and exposed border edges. Early in the season it produces pale blue flowers across its trailing branches of dark green, needle-like foliage.

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants for the garden. It also doubles as an ornamental with its needle-like foliage, ridged stems, and pale lavender flowers that appear in late winter...

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

James H. Schutte

(Rosemary)

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants for the garden. It also doubles as an ornamental with its needle-like foliage, ridged stems, and pale lavender flowers that appear in late winter or spring. Technically a medium-sized woody shrub, it's native to the chaparral lands of southern Europe and North Africa where growing conditions are somewhat arid and the ground porous and well-drained. It’s also adapted to the seaside...