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Plants Matching herb

Returned 187 results. Page 15 of 19.

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

James H. Schutte

(Rosemary)

Rosemary is one of the great culinary herbs for the garden, and the trailing cultivar 'Renzels' has the added appeal of a unique habit that is ideal for walls, edging and rock gardens. So, its ornamental appeal nearly matches its herbal offerings.

Throughout the year this native to the Mediterranean has bright green needle-like leaves, which are potently fragrant from afar. In late winter until early spring, small but pretty edible blue-violet flowers cover the plants.

Rosemary will prosper...

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University

(Rosemary, Salem Rosemary)

Rosemary is one of the great culinary herbs for the garden, and the bushy, upright cultivar 'Salem' has the added appeal of a unique habit that is ideal for hedges and topiary. So, its ornamental appeal nearly matches its herbal offerings.

Throughout the year this native to the Mediterranean has bright gray-green needle-like leaves, which are potently fragrant from afar. In mid-spring to early summer, small but pretty edible blue flowers cover the plants.

Rosemary will prosper in locations...

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

James H. Schutte

(Rosemary)

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants for the garden. It also doubles as an ornamental with its needle-like foliage, ridged stems, and pale lavender flowers that appear in late winter or spring. Technically a medium-sized woody shrub, it's native to the chaparral lands of southern Europe and North Africa where growing conditions are somewhat arid and the ground porous and well-drained. It’s also adapted to the seaside...

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

Mark A. Miller

(Rosemary, Spice Island Rosemary)

Rosemary is one of the great culinary herbs for the garden, and the tall, upright cultivar 'Spice Islands’ has the added appeal of distinctly dark green foliage and rich violet-blue flowers. So, its ornamental appeal nearly matches its herbal offerings.

Throughout the year this native to the Mediterranean has deep green needle-like leaves, which are potently fragrant from afar. In mid-spring to early summer, its small colorful flowers cover the plants.

Rosemary will prosper in locations with...

Image of Rosmarinus officinalis

James H. Schutte

(Rosemary, Tuscan Blue Rosemary)

Rosemary is one of the great culinary herbs for the garden, and the broad, bushy cultivar 'Tuscan Blue’ has the added appeal of distinctly sea green foliage and violet-blue flowers. So, its ornamental appeal nearly matches its herbal offerings.

Throughout the year, this Mediterranean native has needle-like leaves, which are potently fragrant from afar. In mid-spring to early summer, its small colorful flowers cover the plants. They are two-lipped, cool violet blue and attract bees and butterflies...

(Rosemary)

An old European herb most commonly associated with Mediterranean cooking, rosemary is one of the great culinary plants for the garden. It also doubles as an ornamental with its needle-like foliage, ridged stems, and pale lavender flowers that appear in late winter or spring. Technically a medium-sized woody shrub, it's native to the chaparral lands of southern Europe and North Africa where growing conditions are somewhat arid and the ground porous and well-drained. It’s also adapted to the seaside...

Image of Rumex acetosa photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Garden Sorrel)

Garden sorrel's tart, lemony leaves make a sprightly addition to salads and sauces, and are rich in vitamin C. This clump-forming herbaceous perennial is native to cool temperate regions of Eurasia.

The large, arrowhead-shaped leaves are borne in dense rosettes that arise from a stout taproot. Branching clusters of inconspicuous reddish-green flowers appear on tall stalks in early summer. Plants bear either male or female flowers. Female plants produce tiny three-sided fruits that ripen to deep...

Image of Rumex scutatus photo by: Jessie Keith

Jessie Keith

(French Sorrel)

Grown since the Middle Ages for its tangy leaves, this perennial herb is enjoying renewed popularity in gardens and kitchens. Native to Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa, it was first brought into cultivation in Italy and France.

The oval to arrow-shaped, medium- to silvery-green leaves of this low-growing, mat-forming plant are held in dense rosettes. In summer it bears erect, loose clusters of tall inconspicuous greenish flowers. Tan, three-angled seeds follow the blooms.

This...

Image of Ruta graveolens photo by: TL

TL

(Common Rue)

Though technically considered an herb, rue has toxicity issues that render it strictly an ornamental garden plant rather than a utilitarian one. Originating from southern Europe and Southwest Asia, it is an evergreen subshrub that thrives in hot, dry climates. Mature specimens are bushy and have attractive, feathery, blue-green leaves. Historically, its bitter leaves were used to in Mediterranean cooking and to treat various ailments, but it is now known to be dangerous to ingest.

The small,...

Image of Sanguisorba minor photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Garden Burnet, Salad Burnett)

Usually grown in the herb or vegetable garden, garden burnet can be pruned low like a lilliputian edging hedge. The leaves taste of cucumber and can be eaten in salad, soup, or as a refreshing garnish to cool beverages. Garden burnet is a clump-forming perennial native to moist meadows across a large expanse of southern and central Europe into central Asia.

The upright stems of this herbaceous herb grow from underground rhizomes. Each compound leaf comprises four to 12 pairs of rounded leaflets...